20/09/2022

What is a Translation Term Base and Do You Need One?

If you’re looking for ways to improve your translation team’s workflow, to have more consistent results, and to boost the overall quality of a translation project, you may find that a translation term base is a valuable tool to add to your toolkit.

Keep reading to learn about what a term base is and what the benefits of using one are. 

What is a translation term base?

A translation term base is a tool used to house industry, company, and product related terms that a translation team needs to be aware of. A term base acts as a central hub for this detailed information and it can evolve over time as you add new terms. You may choose to start with a monolingual term base and evolve it to a multilingual term base over time. 

A translation term base may include:

  • Source terms or phrases
  • Approved translations
  • Contextual information
  • Definitions of terms
  • Usage notes
  • Parts of speech
  • Grammar
  • Terms that should remain in the source language (such as a brand name)

The key benefits of a translation term base

There are many benefits associated with having a well maintained translation term base, such as:

  • Saving time and confusion. Because a translation term base serves as a terminology guide for a translation team, when there is ambiguity surrounding what term to use, they can quickly reference the term base to save time and to make sure they use the correct term. This is especially helpful when working across multiple departments or with freelance translators. A solid term base helps cut down on research time, which improves workflow. 
  • Improving accuracy, quality, and consistency. Language can be subjective. The use of a term base can nail down the correct words or phrases to use so that the current spelling and terminology is used across all translated materials, which improves the quality of the text.

How it differs from a translation glossary

It’s easy to confuse a translation term base with a translation glossary, but these are two different resources. A translation term base integrates with CAT tools, whereas a translation glossary is usually just a spreadsheet. A translation glossary is a great place to start, but a translation term base is a much more effective tool to use during translation projects. 

Managing and maintaining a translation term base

A translation term base is only a helpful tool if it’s maintained properly. Working with an outdated translation term base can cause easily avoidable mistakes. Term base management involves combining terminology work and database administrative tasks to support the collection, description, processing, presentation, and distribution of information about the terms and any linguistic units used in an organization. 

To properly manage and maintain a good translation term base, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Avoid repetition. You will only want each term to appear in the termbase once, unless a term has more than one meaning. In which case the secondary meaning and approved translation appears in the same entry. You want your term base to be easy to navigate and to cut down on confusion.
  • Keep it tight. You should only include terms in your term base that require definition, you don’t want to include unnecessary terms that aren’t used or that don’t require explanation. Large term bases can be difficult to use and maintain.
  • Review the terms. It’s important to confirm that changes or additions to a termbase are checked and reviewed by a native-speaking subject-matter expert.
  • Update it regularly. Your translation term base should grow and change over time as the company releases products, new technologies emerge, and languages change. You’ll want to add new terms to the translation term base and remove any unnecessary ones from time to time. 
Discover what The Challenges of Translating Gender Neutral Language are
30/08/2022

The Challenges of Translating Gender Neutral Language

A push for a shift to gender neutral language is garnering a lot of attention worldwide. While there is no universally agreed upon answer for how we should handle gender neutral language across a variety of cultures and languages, some individuals and even organizations are choosing to make the shift to not using gendered language choices. 

If you have a source text that has gender neutral language in it and it needs translating, what do you need to know about gender neutral language? Let’s investigate. 

What Gendered Language Is

Gendered language refers to language choices that assign a gender to a noun, verb, pronoun, or adjective. It’s especially common to see gendered language choices in both French and Spanish where nouns have gender inflections. Around the world there is a push happening to embrace gender neutral language. In order to achieve gender neutrality, most languages have to stray away from traditional grammar and linguistic standards and embrace new ones. While some people are more than ready to make this shift, others are fighting to hold onto more traditional language standards. 

Why Gender Neutral Language Matters in Translation

When working on a translation project, it’s important to understand what is happening in the source text in order to decide how it should be translated. If the original document is using gender neutral language, then there is an explicit intention of the author, writer, or company to be inclusive in their communications. Because of this, it would make sense for the translated text to take those gender neutral language choices into account and incorporate them in the translation to the target language to the extent possible.

To What Extent is Gender Neutrality in Translation Possible?

Because gender neutral language may not be as developed in that target language or even target country, it can be challenging to provide a clear and concise translated text that honors the desire of the original creator to use gender neutral language while making sure the newly translated text is easy to understand by the reader. 

Some languages are already genderless, in which case the translator won’t run into any problems. Some cultures are starting to use gender neutral alternatives so translating the text into one of those target languages may also present less roadblocks. 

In some cases, the translators may be able to use workaround word choices that are perfectly correct grammatically and that convey gender neutrality, but some others deviate from the traditional grammar structure. Regardless of whether it’s grammatical or ungrammatical, the use of gender neutral language may not be spread equally within the country or even within certain age groups. In some other cultures, gender neutral language is not even in the conversation.

Because of the various approaches currently being taken to adapt language (or in some cases not adapt it) to being gender neutral, the choice to translate your already gender neutral material is not as simple as it may seem. It’s super important to assess your target audience and consult with in-country linguists regarding the current climate surrounding this for that target audience and country, so you can be informed about what the best way to proceed is.

For those looking to adapt to gender-inclusive language when working with the English language, the United Nations has created helpful strategies that can be applied to any type of communication, including oral or written content, as well as formal or informal speech.

Comparison of the best CAT Tools such as memoQ, Trados Studio and Wordfast Pro
24/08/2022

CAT Tools Comparison: memoQ, Trados Studio and Wordfast Pro

A wide variety of technology solutions supports the many and different needs of localization projects. There are tools that focus on large-scale translation management, while others offer more specific services, like terminology or quality assurance (QA) management. However, among this diversity of software solutions, four applications are ubiquitous in the industry, and their names ring a bell with anybody involved in localization workflows. Trados Studio, memoQ, Memsource, and Wordfast are four of the most popular Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools in the business, preferred by Language Service Providers (LSPs) to manage their projects and by linguists to carry out their daily work.

These tools offer the core functions, such as translation memories (TMs), compatibility with usual formats, term bases (TB), and web-based editors. Yet, they do have their differences. Here we’ll break down some strengths and weaknesses of these four translation allies.

SDL Trados Studio 

There is a general consensus that Trados Studio is the most comprehensive CAT tool in the industry, supporting a wide range of formats and workflows. SDL offers a series of products and solutions for different needs with the additional option for users to buy and download plugins or add-ons. However, its comprehensiveness comes with a complex user interface (UI) that’s not as intuitive as others, sometimes resulting in a rough user experience.

Furthermore, another strength is its relative universality in the industry, and its versatility to integrate all kinds of formats (e. g., subtitles, HTML, InDesign, etc.). As a downside, in order to manage terminology, users need another application not included in the main product, called Trados Multiterm.

memoQ

This application also presents a comprehensive desktop version and a limited web-based editor. It allows LSPs and freelancers to manage documents, TBs, TMs, alignment pairs, and references, among many other features. memoQ also incorporates a QA solution in the same product, without the need of purchasing add-ons or extensions. Its UI is more friendly and intuitive for linguists and project managers, and it’s a ready-to-go solution for various needs. As a con, workflows, features, and layout are not as customizable as in other tools, but overall it’s a flexible and complete product for starters and veterans.

Wordfast Pro

Lighter and more affordable than the other two tools, Wordfast has the advantage of being compatible (and having official support) not only with Windows, but with Mac and Linux, so users can dispense with virtual machines or emulators. Its UI looks simpler and cleaner, but Wordfast Pro isn’t compatible with as many formats as the other tools. On another note, Wordfast Pro can integrate with Wordfast Server, an application for secure online translation memories and glossaries that allow real-time collaborative work among linguists. Despite being practical and useful, this feature can hinder integration between other CAT or QA tools, since users can’t have access to the TMs and TBs as editable files.

Memsource

While the three tools above are more focused on desktop-based solutions, Memsource is one of the most popular translation management systems based on the cloud. It has a lightweight editor and portal, offering TMs, TBs, quality management, and a preview mode. It has mobile integration through mobile apps for PMs and linguists, and a user-friendly interface that makes the software intuitive for both vendors and managers. One of its cons is that Memsource exports MXLIFF files, their native file, which is not easily supported by all the other localization tools.

***

Deciding which tool best suits your needs can be a tough call sometimes, since the choice depends on the client’s needs, usual workflows, resources used, etc. It’s always better to ask for advice from your localization partner before starting working on a certain tool. This way, everybody prevents potential setbacks and comes up collectively with the best solution.

Discover how Game Developers Can Make The Localization Process Easier
16/08/2022

How Game Developers Can Make The Localization Process Easier

When preparing to launch a game in a new locale, going a step past translation into localization is necessary to help a game connect with a new audience on a deeper level. The localization process not only translates the source material into a new language, but makes important adjustments to the content to take historial, religious, and cultural elements of the game into account. To make the localization process simpler from the get go, here are some steps game developers can take when handling the source language and development. 

1. Keep Future Localization Needs in Mind From Day One

If game developers can attempt to foresee any potential locales a game will be launching down the road, they can make the future localization process much simpler. It’s important to know what game elements are cultural and try to predict any “cultural clashes” with other markets that may occur. If you already know which elements could be problematic, you can later focus on adapting those to the new market or just avoid that market altogether and focus on launching in markets that are more similar to yours.

To predict promising locales before launching, it’s important to analyze the target market in terms of game genre preferences, growth in the last few years, potential revenue, and other key elements. What works for other developers will not necessarily work for you. You have to keep the unique characteristics of the game and the target market in mind. It’s a question of finding the ideal match for your game. This research can help you get an idea of what your future localization needs might look like. 

2. Keep Small Details in Mind

While it’s understandable why elements that could cause offense, such as religious or cultural references, may be your priority when creating a game that is primed for localization, you don’t want to forget the small details. You may need to adapt dates, time, numbers, and units of measurements during the game localization process. The formats for dates and units of measurement tend to differ across most languages, so as small as these details are, it’s important you keep them top of mind. 

3. Watch Out for Text in Images

If there is any text used in images, it’s likely you’ll need to localize that text as well. If you’re planning to launch in many different locales, it may save your localization team a lot of time and effort if you can avoid enriching images with text. Your graphics team will also be impacted, as they will have to redesign any images with text from scratch. In some cases this effort may be worth it, but you’ll want to think carefully before adding text to too many images. 

4. Build a Glossary Early On

Whether or not you’re planning on localizing your game content, creating a glossary early on in the game development process is key for maintaining consistency throughout the game. Having one will also make the localization process go much smoother. A glossary contains in-game terms and concepts such as character names, items, statuses, and artifacts that need to be preserved consistently. Being able to reference this glossary throughout the game development and localization process will keep everyone on track.

Internationalization, which is the design and development of a product or type of content keeps localization in mind from the get go. Setting up an internationalization process right away can help prepare your game for the localization process. For example, from day one you can avoid the use of concatenations in English that are extremely challenging for localization as they don’t transfer to most languages.

5. Communicate clearly

To help the localization team succeed, game developers need to be willing to communicate. It can be helpful to assign a point of contact that the localization team can turn to with any questions about the game. That way, the entire development team doesn’t have to worry about fielding questions and the localization team knows exactly who will be able to assist them. Another option you have available to you is implementing query sheets, which can facilitate organized and effective communication between everyone involved in a project. A query sheet is usually an online form or spreadsheet that tracks important details, status updates, and questions and answers about a project. This is a great option if you’re localizing the same game into multiple languages at the same time.

On any type of localization project, it is helpful to make any assets such as images, videos, walkthroughs, screenshots, and term bases with descriptions available to the localization team. That way, they have every resource they need to do the best job possible. Style guides can also be a valuable resource for the localization team.

Discover How Localization can Boost Growth in the Learning and Development Industry
09/08/2022

How localization can boost the Learning & Development Industry Growth

The learning & development industry saw a big uptick in a need for their products during the pandemic, when suddenly countless workplaces sent all of their employees home to work remotely. Learning & development specialists devote a lot of time and resources into creating their educational materials, which are then used by companies to help train their employees. When these training are available in more than one language, companies can extend these training materials to more of their employees. Being able to offer their courses in more than one language can help L&D companies in this industry expand rapidly.

Keep reading to learn more about how localization can benefit the learning & development industry.

Popular Learning & Development Trainings

Digital training materials have become increasingly important for corporations as they make it easier to conduct training for their employees. Typical trainings include courses on how to be safe on the job, how to perform their duties, etc. While these general trainings still occur, training focused on diversity and inclusion, soft skills, and how to improve employee wellbeing have become more relevant. To better understand what types of learning & development materials can benefit from localization, let’s look at a few different popular types of learning & development training.

It’s worth noting that the following topics are strongly culture related. This is why localization is a better fit than translation in this case, as a localization specialist can adapt the content in a course to be suitable for the specific target audience that will be taking the course.

  • Diversity and inclusion training. These days, companies are revisiting their values, training programs, and hiring practices to create a more inclusive workplace. Localized diversity and inclusion training can help them reach their goals in this space more effectively.
  • Employee wellbeing efforts. In light of the Great Resignation, companies have a lot of motivation to try to retain their employees. Companies can incorporate employee well-being into their learning & development materials. These trainings focus on the skills and habits employees need to feel content at work and in other areas of their lives. Localization can help make these learning materials more thoughtful.
  • Soft skill development. There are a lot of soft skills we don’t learn in school that we need in the workplace to thrive. Companies who invest in teaching their employees soft skills through learning & development can build a stronger workforce.

How Localization Can Maximize Learning & Development Trainings

Localization goes a step past translation by taking the target audience’s unique language and cultural habits and preferences into account. This more custom approach can be a game changer in the learning & development industry and can maximize the usability of their educational content. Large companies get more bang for their buck when they invest in multilingual courses, as they can accommodate their global workforce when they offer training. Everyone benefits when more thought and care is put into creating learning & development resources.

As an added bonus, by having access to localized learning & development materials, companies can create a more unified and stronger company culture even if their workforce is spread across the world. This is especially relevant considering that remote working remains popular even after pandemic related workplace closures have come to an end.

19/07/2022

The Role of Technology in the Translation Industry

Technology has impacted all areas of our lives greatly and the translation industry is no exception. In the past, translators did their work using paper and pen, typewriters, and dictionaries. As you can imagine, without the aid of technology, the translation process took a lot of time to complete. Fortunately, much has changed since the rise of the computer and the internet—word processor, access to many more digital resources (dictionaries, glossaries, corpus), reduced research time (no need to go to the library and flip through big books), faster communication with clients and between peers, and access to the best talent in the world make translation work easier and more effective.

Let’s take a closer look at how technology has impacted the translation industry. 

How Technology Has Impacted the Translation Industry

The advancement of computer technology and the internet created a wide range of tools and convenience for every industry, but the translation industry specifically started its road of exponential growth when technology stepped in. As technology expanded, so did our access to other corners of the world. Given the amount of content that needed to be translated to reach other markets and audiences, technology also needed to provide enhanced productivity, communication, and quality assurance tools.

CAT tools were the first big revolution in the translation field and absolutely changed how translators worked thanks to the implementation of translation memory, term bases, and QA checks. While at the beginning CAT tools were deemed to be a threat to human translators, it soon became clear how much they had to offer. Linguists became more efficient and productive, and found in them ways to reduce human errors. Now it seems inconceivable to work without them.

Machine Translation (MT) can be considered the next big revolution. This technological solution was created to help meet that vast demand for fast translation services at a cheaper cost. While the quality standard with MT can be questionable and there’s a lot of room for improvement, there’s no denying that to some extent and in some fields the use of MT can prove to be invaluable.

As demand for translation services grew, other technological tools came to the rescue in order to keep track of everything. Translation Management Systems in particular provide a wide variety of solutions to common translation struggles. This tool organizes all kinds of translation and localization workflows. Some of the benefits of a Translation Management System include: 

  • 24/7 access
  • Automation of workflows
  • Assignments by AI
  • Centralized linguistic assets
  • Easy collaboration
  • Progress tracking
  • Simple integration
  • Built-in accountability
  • Scalability
  • Deadline management
  • Improved translation quality
  • Transparent ROI

The Takeaway 

Technology has its faults—there’s no doubt about that—but in the translation industry it has been an enabler for progress. As long as all parties involved in the process understand that technology has its limitations, it can be used to do more, better, and faster work. In a world where access to information in a language everybody understands has become critical, having technology on our side is an enormous help.

Why-is-it-important-that-the-translator-has-a-translation-degree-or-certification
12/07/2022

Why is it important that the translator has a translation degree or certification?

The translation industry is made up of talented translators that hail from a variety of backgrounds. While some translators have earned a translation degree or certification, many other translators haven’t pursued a formal translation education. This begs the question, why isn’t there a set education standard in the translation industry? And is it important for translators to have a translation degree or certification? Let’s investigate.

Global Standards Vary

The translation industry is a global industry and one of the reasons that translators can have differing educational experiences is because every country has their own unique set of academic standards. In some countries, you can attend a university and earn your translation degree after four or five years of study. In other countries, the universities may not offer an equivalent degree, but you may be able to take short translation courses focused on specific fields. Some countries only have translation associations that offer certifications like ATA. Point being, the education opportunities and therefore the hiring standards to become a translator, can vary greatly depending on where a translator lives. 

Why Do Translation Degrees and Certifications Have Value?

A translation degree or certification illustrates that a translator has the knowledge necessary to do translation work and do it well. This is especially helpful for those who are new in their career without much work experience under their belt. While some translators learn the necessary skills to do this job on their own through a lot of practice, not having credentials to account for what they know can create a roadblock for them. 

Pursuing a translation degree or certification plays an important role in learning how to work as a translator and how to create a linguistically and culturally accurate message. Some people believe being bilingual is enough to become a translator, but in reality, being bilingual does not ensure that you have the skills necessary to be an accurate translator who can tackle all the important aspects of communication in both languages. 

The Benefits of Extending Education

Translators tend to be curious creatures, or at least in an ideal situation, they should be. A good translator must always be learning about new tools and reading about the latest developments in their fields of expertise. Some translators, after obtaining their degree in translation, go on to earn a degree in finance, the arts, history, or another subject relevant to their expertise. This desire to continue their education shows how committed a professional translator can be to delivering a top quality service.

What Employers and Clients Need to Know

To be on the safe side, always work with people who have become experts in the translation of specific language combinations through extensive studies. We know that literally everything can be translated, but not every translation has the same impact. There are fields that are very sensitive, such as those that have anything to do with health, security, and law. When it comes to the legal industry, some documents require a certified translation and having credentials is a requirement, not an option. Certain industries allow no room for error, so working with a professional with vast linguistic and subject matter knowledge and experience is always your best bet. It’s worth noting that for some language combinations, there are no official certifications or academic programs available, so it’s important to do your research before hiring to be aware of what standards your candidate can realistically meet.

Everything you need to know when planning a voice-over project
04/05/2022

Planning a Voice-over Project? Here’s What You Need to Know!

If you’re planning a voice-over project, you may be feeling a bit overwhelmed at all the work that lies ahead of you. One of the best ways to efficiently tackle a voice-over project is to have a clear plan in place. These are some of the important elements you need to know about, so you can properly manage a voice-over project from start to finish. 

Script

Before you can begin recording a voice-over, you need a solid script. This text document, created for the purpose of a voice-over recording, contains the text that needs to be recorded. A script can also provide additional comments to be taken into account, like special instructions or clarifications for a specific utterance (we’ll dive into this issue further in a minute). 

The script can already be in the language you need it to be or you may need to translate it first. For example, if you have already created an e-learning course in English that you want to translate into Spanish, the script will need to undergo translation first. It’s recommended that the client reviews the final translations and approves of the translated script before the recording step begins. This will prevent future updates to the script and recordings. 

Synchronization 

If your voice-over project corresponds to a video, you’ll need to confirm whether or not the audio needs to be synchronized with the video. This process is referred to as timed vs untimed voice-over and will play a factor in how the script reader paces themselves while speaking. Determining this beforehand can help provide an accurate quote since these two types are quoted differently. Timed-voice is generally a little more expensive because it takes more time to make and to time it perfectly.

Samples

Still, looking for the right voice-over talent for your project? This video shares some helpful tips for finding the right fit!

It’s important that you select the right voice-over talent for your project. Not all voices will necessarily be suitable for your specific type of project, so make sure you align the project purpose with the right voice. Let’s say the target audience of your project are children, then the selected voice should sound appealing to them. In this case, a woman with a soft and soothing voice may be better suited for the job. Requesting samples of the talent’s work will help you gauge whether or not they are the best voice for your project. 

File Names and Formats

If you prefer using a specific naming convention, label, or file format, it’s important to stay consistent. Some projects require several audio files to be recorded, which can be challenging to keep organized. Continuing with the example of the e-learning course, you may have an audio recording for each slide. Having a naming convention will enable easy identification and prevent time spent searching for the right file later on.

Instructions or Clarifications

You want your voice-over project to be as effective as possible, so you should always communicate your expectations to the voice-over talent. What might be a given for you, might not be for them. Your voice talent should know your preferred pronunciation for acronyms and special terms, if numbers on a list should be read or not, and if special emphasis is needed somewhere, among other important details. You can create a document with two columns, where the first one contains the text to be recorded, and the second one states any necessary clarifications the voice-over artist talent should be aware of.

What is proofreading and why is it necessary in translation?
26/04/2022

What is proofreading and why is it a necessary step in translation?

Every translator and translation team has their own process in place for delivering what they feel is top quality work. While some translators follow a two-part process that involves translation and proofreading, at Terra Translations we suggest a three step process that includes editing. At first glance, editing and proofreading may seem somewhat redundant, so let’s look at why that isn’t the case, how these steps vary, and why proofreading is such a necessary step in the translation process. 

The Difference Between Editing and Proofreading

The point of undergoing both editing and proofreading is to ensure accuracy and create a quality translation, so it’s not surprising that many people use these terms interchangeably. However, there is a difference between editing and proofreading, and they should be treated as separate activities. 

Editing is when you execute changes to the translation and make suggestions to improve the overall quality of the product. Ideally, editing will lead to the translation becoming more consistent, sharper, and error free. An editor typically takes on the following responsibilities: 

  • Doing a bilingual review between the original text and the translated version
  • Identifying and correcting any translation errors
  • Pointing out inconsistencies and adjusting to better suit market and audience needs
  • Ensuring the correct use of language
  • Confirming that the translated message is conveyed correctly in regards to both language and culture
  • Double check that the style is correct and make suggestions to improve it

Proofreading focuses on correcting any superficial errors in the translated content, such as spelling or grammar errors, formatting, punctuation, or syntax. The proofreading process begins once you have a potential “final” version of the content to work with. As this is the final step of the process, the proofreader should read the text and try to make sense of it as if they themselves were the target audience. This is especially helpful as they are the final pair of eyes on the content before submission to the client or publication.

The Importance of Proofreading

Proofreading is such an important step because during translation and editing, your original text can undergo many variations as it is reworded into a different language. When translating, the goal is not to translate word by word but to think how the same message would be said in the target language. During this process, translators may copy structures seen in the source language unintentionally and when the editor is fixing issues like this, they may introduce unintentional mistakes such as typos, double spaces, a missing word, repeated articles, and misplaced commas. These are the type of mistakes that ideally a proofreader will spot and fix.

Proofreading is a valuable step in the translation process and helps lead to an error-free translation product that illustrates how carefully translated the work is and what high quality work the translator does. 

When Should You Proofread?

The proofreading step should be the last part of your quality assurance process. You won’t dive as deep during proofreading as you did during editing. Proofreading gives you a fresh opportunity to catch any mistakes not found in the editing stage and as you’re more focused on looking for superficial errors than making massive changes to the language and expression, it can be easier to catch small errors such as grammatical or spelling ones. 

Ideally, you’ll have a second translator carry out the editing and a third translator take care of the proofreading process, as a fresh set of eyes can more easily spot errors that the first translator and editor may have overlooked. Proofreading is a challenging task and it can be tempting to make changes relating to personal preference, but at that stage the translator should focus on just fixing mistakes and syntax issues.

How long does a translation project take?
22/03/2022

How Long Does a Translation Project Take?

When you need translation work done, it can be tempting to want to speed up the timeline a bit. Who doesn’t want to wrap up an exciting project as quickly as possible? While these feelings are understandable, trying to cut corners and rush through translation work can lead to less than desired results. Let’s take a look at how long an average translation project takes to complete, as well as how to speed up the process in an effective way. 

How Long Does the Average Translation Project Take to Complete?

How long a translation project takes depends greatly on the word count of the documents that you need translated. On average, a human translator can output 300 words per hour or 2,500 words per day. You also need to factor in some extra time for self-review of the work. After completion of the translation, giving the translator an extra day or two (depending on the final word count) provides time for them to proofread their work completely and allows them to approach their work with a fresh mind to make sure everything is polished.

Of course, this estimate is not a guarantee, but it can give you a general idea of how long a translation project can take to finish.

What Can Affect the Length of the Project?

There are many factors that can affect how long a translation project can take. Here are a few of them to take into consideration when trying to estimate how fast you can get a project completed.

  • The complexity of the text
  • Research requirements 
  • Experience level of the translators
  • Availability of the translator(s) and their current workload
  • Technical issues
  • Linguistic resources
  • Extensive workflow (edition, proofreading, DTP)
  • If a project involves more than one language

How to Speed Up the Process

If you’re looking to speed up your translation project timeline, without sacrificing quality, there are a few elements that can make the process go smoother and quicker. 

While it may be tempting to request a translator work longer hours in order to hasten their turnaround, we don’t advise this. Translation work requires deep focus and attention to detail. You don’t want someone who is overtired to work on your translation project. That’s how mistakes can happen

The Takeaway

While it’s impossible to nail down exactly how long a translation project will take without consulting your translation team, you can generally expect translators to output around 2,500 words per day. That being said, trying to cut corners in order to speed up your timeline can lead to quality issues. There are some legitimate steps you can take to help a translator work faster, like implementing CAT tools, so chat with your translation team about what resources they need to help you meet your timeline goals and to get the job done the right way.