Transitioning Teachers in the US Look at New Career Paths in Instructional Design
06/12/2022

Transitioning Teachers in the US Look at New Career Paths in Instructional Design

Post-pandemic burnout is affecting many professionals, but teachers who had to face especially difficult workplace challenges over the past few years are particularly struggling with burnout. Many teachers that are choosing to veer away from their original career path are heading towards the instructional design industry, as it allows them to leverage their backgrounds in education while giving them the opportunity to work remotely instead of in a classroom. They can put their classroom-honed instructional design skills into the creation of eLearning content.

Instructional design involves creating learning experiences and materials resulting in the acquisition and application of knowledge and skills. Even though instructional design encompasses all learning materials, it’s most frequently associated with corporate training and eLearning for universities or other educational institutions.

Let’s look at some tips that teachers can use to find a job in instructional design and to thrive in that role.

Highlight Adaptable Skills

Transitioning teachers are facing the challenge of adapting the skills they gained in classrooms into ones they can utilize in a new career in the learning and development (L&D) space. How they frame their skills during their job search can help them illustrate to potential employers just how adaptable their teaching skills are.

For example, teachers have experience trying different teaching approaches in order to see what works for their students and what doesn’t. They know how to adapt their content to suit “their audience”. They have also seen firsthand the challenge of having students in their classrooms who don’t speak English as their native language. In 2019, 10.4% of K-12 students were English-language learners (ELL) students and by 2025, an estimated 25% percent of public school students will be ELL students.

Expand Their Network

As teachers look for new horizons, it’s key that they find networking spaces that can help them enter the L&D space successfully. There are multiple non-profit organizations, like GLDC (Global Learning & Development Community), that offer resources and create an environment where they can connect with other professionals in the industry and can get career advice.

Mariana Horrisberger, eLearning localization specialist and business development manager at Terra, is one of the organizers of GLDC. She co-leads meetups every Wednesday and Friday, where they get together to meet peers from the industry, discuss L&D topics, and share their knowledge and experience with those making their first steps into this field. They also currently have a Project Club led by Russell Sweep, where they discuss the eLearning Heroes Challenge of the week and provide feedback to each other’s projects. In 2022, this organization hosted a Summer Break Room during the month of July to get transitioning teachers together to network and share information and advice about the industry. Another networking group that could be of interest is Teaching: A path to L&D led by Sara Stevick—where members share important information for teachers looking to transition to the eLearning industry.

Keep Localization In Mind

It’s essential that as teachers transition to this new space—and given the global aspect of the eLearning industry—they keep localization in mind. Meaning that while they work on creating courses, they remain aware of aspects of their work that could potentially present challenges during localization. Accessibility is a top priority nowadays, with students from all corners of the world trying to learn the abilities necessary to work and succeed in the modern world and being knowledgeable of internationalization is a skill that can help them land their first job in the industry.

29/11/2022

How to Become Your Localization Team’s Hero

A strong localization kit is made up of multiple elements that vary in accordance with the complexity of a particular project. In general, localization kits contain a translation memory, glossary, termbase, style guide, and reference materials. Having a well-built out localization kit is a great way to get a project headed in the right direction. That being said, there is much more you can do to help your localization team do their best work and to ensure they have a great experience working with you. 

Let’s look at a few ways you can become your localization team’s hero!

Provide editable files 

Your localization team will save a lot of time if you provide them with an editable file as a source file to kick off their translation. Having an editable file helps avoid file conversions, which can look rather unpolished. If you do have to pursue a file conversion because the editable file is unavailable, the localization team will need to create a polished final document and DTP will be necessary, which can extend the project timeline

Determine the file extension you want to receive

If your localization team is aware of the type of file extension you want to receive, they’ll be able to choose the best translation tools for the specific project. Using the correct tool will help them prevent unnecessary exports and imports into different tools. If the content consists of loose strings of text, which is usually the case with software, then it’s important to organize it in a logical way that everyone on the team can understand. 

Add comments to the files

Adding comments to the file can help translators make sense of content. For example, if a translator is working on translating a video game, they may need context surrounding a character’s gender. Leaving a comment indicating what the gender of each character is, is super important as in some languages, adjective choices are affected by gender. Leaving comments throughout the file that provide additional context can help your localization team make the best word choices. 

Share a demo or beta version

When it comes to apps, video games, and software, sharing a demo or beta version can really help a translation team get a feel of the product. If you aren’t able to share an advanced copy of the product, perhaps you can share watermarked screenshots instead, so the team isn’t working blindly. 

Stay on top of formatting

If you want the formatting of the target document to mirror the formatting in the original document, you need to share that desire with your localization team in advance so that they can allocate the correct amount of time and resources to formatting the target document properly.

Determine timeline expectations and be flexible

While your localization team will always do their best to meet your desired deadline, be open to being flexible on your deadline if it helps the team avoid rushing and allow them to assess the project and confirm if the amount of time needed in order to provide a high-quality deliverable is in line with your expectations.

Be available and ready to answer questions

Your team will need to be able to come to you with questions in order to create the best possible final product. You don’t need to be available to answer questions 24/7, but you should make it clear how and when they can get in touch with you if they have questions. To help answer any major questions they may have, you can establish a query sheet as a way to streamline communication.

All of that being said, you’ll still need to be available to answer questions from time to time, so they can move forward with confidence.

VR & localization the key to an immersive experience for users worldwide
23/11/2022

VR & Localization: The Key to an Immersive Experience for Users Worldwide

Virtual reality (VR) refers to a simulated experience that can either be totally different or very similar to the real world. It is achieved by creating a sensory environment using primarily sight and sound to create an interactive and immersive experience. VR is rising in popularity day by day and by 2025, the VR industry is expected to be worth more than $22 billion. One reason for this industry’s continued growth in popularity is due to VR’s endless potential to create experiences and immersive environments, as these headsets can make it easier to integrate games into education, entertainment, and many other endeavors.

Standard VR systems tend to rely on VR headsets in order to generate the realistic sensations that create the immersive environment that VR is known for. VR headsets generally include what is known as a head-mounted display (HMD). This HMD is a wraparound headset that blocks light and real-world images so the user can focus on the virtual world they are entering. During 2022, it’s anticipated that consumer AR/VR headset shipments will reach 13.24 million units.

It’s also expected that over time as improvements to VR hardware are made (such as designing smaller and more stylish headsets) and as they become more affordable, that interest in this industry will continue to grow. For example, a less cumbersome device may increase popularity in healthcare training such as training simulations for surgeons.

Let’s take a closer look at the applications and industries that VR can apply to, as well as why localization for VR is becoming a growing need.

Applications and Industries

These are some of the industries that are embracing VR:

  • Entertainment. VR is especially common in the gaming sector as VR can create an exceptional game experience for players who want to immerse themselves in the world the game takes place in.
  • Training. The learning and development possibilities of VR are nearly endless—especially for providing a more hands-on corporate training experience.
  • Tourism. Imagine being able to make someone feel like they are visiting your city and encourage them to visit by introducing them to your most exciting sites virtually.
  • Well-being. A more immersive wellness experience can be found when you combine VR with apps that help guide meditation, workouts, mindfulness, and relaxation.
  • E-learning. Many students engage with their learning materials and retain them better when using VR during the e-learning experience.

VR Localization

The fact that more industries are adopting VR and with headsets becoming more affordable, it is natural for this technology to reach new markets and people that speak different languages. This is where localization comes in.

When someone is engaging with an immersive experience, you don’t want them to become confused by language or prompts they don’t understand. Localization makes it possible to translate elements like prompts, buttons, in-app menus and messages, narration or voice-over cues in the app the consumer uses. Anything that requires interaction on the part of the user needs to be easily understood by them or else you risk your message not coming across clearly, or the user not being able to properly navigate the experience—all of which can lead to the user leaving a bad review of the app. Content in the app store also needs to be localized, as the app store description helps them select and decide to purchase the app. Making sure this text is in a language the user understands can make a difference in the total number of downloads.

As VR adoption continues to expand and more industries realize the potential it has, it’s only a matter of time before the localization needs in the industry also increase. This is key to ensure access to this technology and its applications are not restricted to English speakers only, making these virtual worlds into more inclusive and diverse spaces.

15/11/2022

Brazil & Mobile Apps: A Growing Market

If you’re an app developer or company that benefits by having customers download your mobile app, then you will want to pay more attention to the Brazilian market. The extensive use of mobile phones, and consequently apps, in Brazil makes this one of the hottest mobile app markets in the world. Localizing your apps into Brazilian Portuguese in order to capture this huge market that loves apps so much is a gold mine of opportunity. 

Let’s examine exactly why Brazil has so much mobile potential. 

High Amount of Time Spent Using Apps

According to recent research, Brazil spends more time on mobile apps than any other country. When it comes to time spent on mobile apps, Brazilians spend an average of 5.4 hours each day connected to apps. This leaves app developers with a very captive audience if they take the right approach to localizing their apps for the Brazilian market. 

Access to smartphones in Brazil has been growing over the years, which is contributing to this high usage of mobile apps. In 2019 alone, Brazil’s smartphone growth exploded by 11%. With expected continued growth in regard to smartphone access, the potential to thrive in this market is seemingly endless. By 2023, cell phone sales in Brazil are expected to expand massively, with four million Brazilians owning a smartphone.

An Affinity for Mobile Shopping

One way Brazilians utilize their mobile devices is by shopping from them. In 2019, mobile sales surpassed $7.6 billion in revenue and accounted for 32% of all ecommerce payments in Brazil. With the majority of Brazilians preferring to make purchases over an app (78%), because of how efficient and straightforward the process is, it’s safe to assume that this trend of shopping from smartphones will continue to make an impact. 

All of that being said, you need to get the mobile shopping experience right if you want loyalty from Brazilian customers. More than half (53%) of Brazilians are willing to pay more for a product or service if the user experience is better, this is 12% higher than the global average. If you can properly localize your apps in a way that makes the mobile shopping experience easier and less stressful for Brazilians, you’re off to a really strong start. 

A Deep Love of Mobile Games

While mobile app usage varies, Brazilians are particularly enamored with mobile games. Brazil is the world’s largest Portuguese-speaking country and only one in 20 Brazilians speaks English. Because the majority of the Brazilian population does not speak English and really values localized content, it’s important for mobile game developers to have a localization and culturalization strategy in place. In order to make a mobile game appeal to Brazilian gamers, and to ensure they have a high quality experience, you must localize your mobile game specifically into Brazilian Portuguese (as opposed to European Portuguese). This is especially important if you hope to attract younger audiences.

25/10/2022

4 Reasons To Localize Your Global Training Program

Running a business that employs workers from around the world is no easy feat, but it makes it possible to expand into new markets and to tap into a diverse talent pool. Companies that make localization a key part of their global training pipeline can benefit greatly. How? Let’s look at four different ways that localization can improve your global training strategy.

Employees Learn Better Even if your workforce all speaks the language of business—aka English—, providing employees with access to training materials in their native language can help them learn better. Doing so can also make them feel like they belong to a more inclusive workplace environment. You can help avoid unnecessary misunderstandings and can make it easier for them to retain information by allowing them to learn in their native language. If you can provide your employees with resources that make thriving in their job easier, why wouldn’t you?

Employees Get Maximum ROI on Learning Initiatives

When employees understand and retain educational materials better, that clearly benefits their personal and professional development, but their employers also benefit. If you’re going to invest a lot of time and money into creating learning initiatives and then are going to have your employees commit more time and resources to consuming that content, you want to get the most ROI possible. When you provide localized training materials, you can help increase productivity and can enhance retention of the learning materials — all of which end up benefiting you as their employer.

Companies Create a More Equal Workplace

Employers should take whatever steps possible to create a more fair and equitable workplace. One way to do this is to give all employees, no matter what their native language is, the same level of opportunity when it comes to improving their skills and reaching their full potential at your company. If a company doesn’t localize its training materials, they risk putting non-native English-speaking employees at a disadvantage. While they may not mean to do this, they may make it more difficult for their employees to grasp critical concepts by not localizing their training materials. If you want a global workforce, you need to support them properly and localization can help you do that.

Companies Enjoy Optimal Resource Utilization

When you expand your workforce globally, you must also enhance your training efforts to make them work on a more diverse scale. While localization is an investment, that investment will pay off and save you time and money in the end by helping you make the most of the resources you already have. When you localize your global training program, you create a better company culture, help employees learn better, and make a fairer working environment, and as a result, your employees will thrive. You want all of your employees to have the best chance of understanding and retaining learning materials and localization can help you reach that goal.

11/10/2022

How the Video Game Localization Testing Process Works and Why it Matters

It takes a lot of work to create a video game with an intriguing plot, well-developed characters, and a unique universe. The work doesn’t stop there if you want to localize your video game in order to break into new markets. A key step to ensuring that your localized video game is just as dynamic as the original is to undergo localization testing. Let’s take a closer look at what the video game localization testing process looks like and why it’s so important. 

What the Video Game Localization Testing Process Involves

So, what exactly does video game testing involve? Generally, the testing isn’t done by the translator. Instead, the testing is completed by a testing company or a hired tester who plays the game and identifies bugs.

The main goal of the testing phase is to make the product look and feel natural for the gamer as well as making sure the gameplay works fine. Testers not only check for linguistic or cultural issues, but also other visual or gameplay issues. 

Some of the things testers will check are the proper date, time, and currency formats corresponding to the regions and locales used. Color schemes are an important element to review too, as color can have different meanings in various cultures

Most importantly, the testers check the UI and appearance. They check that all the images containing text are localized, line breaks on the screens are in proper places, dialogs, pop-ups, and notifications or updates appear correctly, and that the text fits into all the fields without overflowing. 

Why the Video Game Localization Testing Process Matters

The reason localization testing is such an important step is because it helps video game creators confirm that the localized and translated version of their video game is consistent, clear, and as high quality as the original version. A high quality localization process ensures that a game maintains the original tone and feel of the game in whatever language it is translated into. The video game localization testing process is a key step because it helps check for this level of quality. You want your players to be able to play and understand your video game exactly as you intended it upon your original creation, even if it’s in a different language. 

The video game localization testing process isn’t necessary because translators and localization experts aren’t good at their jobs. It’s necessary as a second line of defense in a very complex process. Video game localization requires that a lot of different strings be translated and it’s commonplace to translate these strings out of order or context, which can lead to things literally getting lost in translation. Localization testing is a necessary step to review a translation as a whole and to make sure that all text is correct, coherent, and consistent. 

Don’t Forget to Laugh At Mistakes

As frustrating as finding a mistake is during the testing process, mistakes can happen and they aren’t always a bad thing. 

In the video game “Hitman: Blood Money”, there’s a mistake that’s become a fan favorite. In the mission titled “A Dance with the Devil”, there’s a lobster crate located in the kitchen area. If you pick it up and inspect it, you will see a development note addressed to Allan that read “Allan please add details here”. This mistake led to future appearances of the same note across a variety of Hitman games in the form of Easter eggs. For a good laugh, you can check out that famous mistake here

13/09/2022

How to Get the Buy-In for Localization from Stakeholders

While it seemed like we were living in a digital world pre-pandemic, the onset of COVID-19 made our society more reliant on technology than ever before. The amount of global internet users is on the rise and they are spending more and more time online between working, socializing, and relaxing. International businesses that are ready to adapt both digitally and globally will have a competitive advantage. Localization is an important step business can take to launch products and services in new markets successfully. That being said, localization is a big undertaking and there may be times when decision-makers need convincing to invest in the process. Let’s take a look at how to get the go-ahead for localization from stakeholders. 

Set Clear Localization Goals

First things first, you have to set clear localization goals that will guide the requests you’re making and that can outline what you hope to achieve by investing in localization. Whether you’re looking to increase revenue, attract new customers, or improve global brand recognition, you’ll want to outline your end goals. If you can clearly share what you believe introducing localization to your translation projects will achieve, it will be easier for stakeholders to understand the value of taking this extra step. If you can show what types of problems localization can solve, you’re presenting solutions to problems, not just making a request.  

Know Your Market Backwards and Forwards

Again, before you make any formal requests surrounding localization, it’s important to get organized. Once you’ve set your localization goals, study your target market’s buyer behavior, the applicability of your products or services, what your competitors in the space are doing, and any other key market elements. 

To demonstrate the importance of localization, you need to show you understand not only your company’s current landscape but what your market looks like as a whole. Give your audience the attention they deserve to create products and services they will find valuable. Are there cultural preferences you should keep in mind before launching in a new market? What local pain points can your product solve? Have similar brands thrived or failed after launching in the area? Localization is a valuable process that can make it easier to connect with new audiences, so it’s important to carefully examine your market and where localization can step in to make an impact. 

Present Your Case the Right Way

After doing market research and identifying localization goals, you should have the insight you need to make it clear that localization is an investment worth making and not just an extra expense. Localization can be a major needle mover when it comes to growing in a new market and generating revenue. To best explain how this investment can pay off, it can be helpful to allow localization experts to join the conversation. They’ll know firsthand the potential consequences of embarking on international business without taking a thoughtful approach to localization. 

When arguing your case, it can be helpful to present evidence of the potential localization brought to the table. For example, CSA found that companies that increased their translation budget were 1.5 times more likely to report an increase in total revenue. Adding localization costs into your translation budget can lead to positive results and ignoring the potential of localization can be damaging. You should make it clear to all stakeholders what the risks are of passing over localization. The last thing you want is for your brand to experience negative effects that can be challenging to recover from in new markets. 

Discover how Game Developers Can Make The Localization Process Easier
16/08/2022

How Game Developers Can Make The Localization Process Easier

When preparing to launch a game in a new locale, going a step past translation into localization is necessary to help a game connect with a new audience on a deeper level. The localization process not only translates the source material into a new language, but makes important adjustments to the content to take historial, religious, and cultural elements of the game into account. To make the localization process simpler from the get go, here are some steps game developers can take when handling the source language and development. 

1. Keep Future Localization Needs in Mind From Day One

If game developers can attempt to foresee any potential locales a game will be launching down the road, they can make the future localization process much simpler. It’s important to know what game elements are cultural and try to predict any “cultural clashes” with other markets that may occur. If you already know which elements could be problematic, you can later focus on adapting those to the new market or just avoid that market altogether and focus on launching in markets that are more similar to yours.

To predict promising locales before launching, it’s important to analyze the target market in terms of game genre preferences, growth in the last few years, potential revenue, and other key elements. What works for other developers will not necessarily work for you. You have to keep the unique characteristics of the game and the target market in mind. It’s a question of finding the ideal match for your game. This research can help you get an idea of what your future localization needs might look like. 

2. Keep Small Details in Mind

While it’s understandable why elements that could cause offense, such as religious or cultural references, may be your priority when creating a game that is primed for localization, you don’t want to forget the small details. You may need to adapt dates, time, numbers, and units of measurements during the game localization process. The formats for dates and units of measurement tend to differ across most languages, so as small as these details are, it’s important you keep them top of mind. 

3. Watch Out for Text in Images

If there is any text used in images, it’s likely you’ll need to localize that text as well. If you’re planning to launch in many different locales, it may save your localization team a lot of time and effort if you can avoid enriching images with text. Your graphics team will also be impacted, as they will have to redesign any images with text from scratch. In some cases this effort may be worth it, but you’ll want to think carefully before adding text to too many images. 

4. Build a Glossary Early On

Whether or not you’re planning on localizing your game content, creating a glossary early on in the game development process is key for maintaining consistency throughout the game. Having one will also make the localization process go much smoother. A glossary contains in-game terms and concepts such as character names, items, statuses, and artifacts that need to be preserved consistently. Being able to reference this glossary throughout the game development and localization process will keep everyone on track.

Internationalization, which is the design and development of a product or type of content keeps localization in mind from the get go. Setting up an internationalization process right away can help prepare your game for the localization process. For example, from day one you can avoid the use of concatenations in English that are extremely challenging for localization as they don’t transfer to most languages.

5. Communicate clearly

To help the localization team succeed, game developers need to be willing to communicate. It can be helpful to assign a point of contact that the localization team can turn to with any questions about the game. That way, the entire development team doesn’t have to worry about fielding questions and the localization team knows exactly who will be able to assist them. Another option you have available to you is implementing query sheets, which can facilitate organized and effective communication between everyone involved in a project. A query sheet is usually an online form or spreadsheet that tracks important details, status updates, and questions and answers about a project. This is a great option if you’re localizing the same game into multiple languages at the same time.

On any type of localization project, it is helpful to make any assets such as images, videos, walkthroughs, screenshots, and term bases with descriptions available to the localization team. That way, they have every resource they need to do the best job possible. Style guides can also be a valuable resource for the localization team.

Discover How Localization can Boost Growth in the Learning and Development Industry
09/08/2022

How localization can boost the Learning & Development Industry Growth

The learning & development industry saw a big uptick in a need for their products during the pandemic, when suddenly countless workplaces sent all of their employees home to work remotely. Learning & development specialists devote a lot of time and resources into creating their educational materials, which are then used by companies to help train their employees. When these training are available in more than one language, companies can extend these training materials to more of their employees. Being able to offer their courses in more than one language can help L&D companies in this industry expand rapidly.

Keep reading to learn more about how localization can benefit the learning & development industry.

Popular Learning & Development Trainings

Digital training materials have become increasingly important for corporations as they make it easier to conduct training for their employees. Typical trainings include courses on how to be safe on the job, how to perform their duties, etc. While these general trainings still occur, training focused on diversity and inclusion, soft skills, and how to improve employee wellbeing have become more relevant. To better understand what types of learning & development materials can benefit from localization, let’s look at a few different popular types of learning & development training.

It’s worth noting that the following topics are strongly culture related. This is why localization is a better fit than translation in this case, as a localization specialist can adapt the content in a course to be suitable for the specific target audience that will be taking the course.

  • Diversity and inclusion training. These days, companies are revisiting their values, training programs, and hiring practices to create a more inclusive workplace. Localized diversity and inclusion training can help them reach their goals in this space more effectively.
  • Employee wellbeing efforts. In light of the Great Resignation, companies have a lot of motivation to try to retain their employees. Companies can incorporate employee well-being into their learning & development materials. These trainings focus on the skills and habits employees need to feel content at work and in other areas of their lives. Localization can help make these learning materials more thoughtful.
  • Soft skill development. There are a lot of soft skills we don’t learn in school that we need in the workplace to thrive. Companies who invest in teaching their employees soft skills through learning & development can build a stronger workforce.

How Localization Can Maximize Learning & Development Trainings

Localization goes a step past translation by taking the target audience’s unique language and cultural habits and preferences into account. This more custom approach can be a game changer in the learning & development industry and can maximize the usability of their educational content. Large companies get more bang for their buck when they invest in multilingual courses, as they can accommodate their global workforce when they offer training. Everyone benefits when more thought and care is put into creating learning & development resources.

As an added bonus, by having access to localized learning & development materials, companies can create a more unified and stronger company culture even if their workforce is spread across the world. This is especially relevant considering that remote working remains popular even after pandemic related workplace closures have come to an end.

28/06/2022

An Overview of the History of Video Game Localization

Despite its wide use today, video game localization is a relatively new endeavor. Video game creators started having their content localized in the 1980s and only recently, video game localization technologies and processes allowed for certain advancements. To better understand the need for video game localization, it can be helpful to look back at the history of this technique. 

The 1970’s: The Beginnings

The 1970s is where video game localization really comes into play. Japanese developers were looking to break into the American market and this drove them to start thinking about localization.

One of the most famous examples comes from the internationally popular video game PacMan. The Japanese name was initially thought of as “Puck Man” (pronounced ‘pakkuman’), but when localizing the product for the US market, they decided to change the name to avoid the name being misspelled or misused with another word that could be offensive or inappropriate.

1980s: Initial stages of localization

The 1980s is where we see the initial stages of video game localization beginning. During the 1980s, games started to be localized, but there was a lack of awareness of the importance of using native and specialized linguists. As a result, this stage was the funniest, or one could say tragicomic, in terms of localization. This is essentially because you see completely incorrect translations, some of which still exist today and continue to be referred to.

The translation of packaging and documentation became standard practice in the gaming industry for publishers who understood that this small investment could help them increase their revenue in international markets. Super Mario Bros was distributed with packaging and documentation translated into German, French, Spanish, Italian, and Dutch—although the in-game text remained in English.

1990s: Demand grows

In the 1990s many games began to see their text translated on screen, and departments and companies that specialized in video game localization began to open. We were not only getting the box and docs translated, but we were also seeing the localization of the user interface and subtitles for the cinematics.  

This was huge for international audiences, because they could now immerse themselves in the game in their own language. Localization made video games more accessible to so many more players.

Some games from the 1990s are particularly memorable because they went as far as recording the voiceovers in other languages. Baldur’s Gate was one of the first RPGs that was localized and dubbed into other languages. 

By the end of the nineties, revenues doubled in the gaming industry, and more than half of that growth came from the results driven by localization

2000s: Localization established

We are calling this stage “localization established”, because in the early 2000s there were technological improvements to facilitate the localization process. This is when video games started to be dubbed in different languages with actors. It was also around this time when video games started to be published in a variety of languages.

This was the birth of what is known as ‘sim-ship’, publishers were simultaneously shipping the games in a variety of languages to be released on the same date in all of its language variants.

Nowadays, localization is an essential process in the development of a video game and many companies now have an exclusive team of professionals dedicated to localization and testing. There are also increasingly sophisticated tools available to coordinate and ensure quality during the localization process.