09/02/2021

Localization Moves to the Studio: About Voice-Over Services

Content is king and the localization industry offers multiple mediums to serve it. From translation to transcreation, from subtitling to dubbing, language service providers have fitting solutions to localize audiovisual materials. Throughout marketing campaigns, streaming platforms, e-learning courses, just to name a few, translation is crucial because audiences and markets flourish when content is available in the users’ languages.

Media localization solutions have different outcomes, workflows, schedules and budgets. For example, subtitling or captioning can be cheaper and faster than recording voice-over tracks, since the process of producing and reviewing it doesn’t require studio sessions. However, localizing voices with native talents can result in a more engaging experience for the audience. This is why voice-over services are sometimes the ideal ally for campaigns, videos or courses.

Off-screen narration

Voice-over is the simplest way of localizing audio recordings. It’s mostly used for documentaries, e-learning courses, and instructional and institutional videos when there is an off-screen voice. The process’ deliverable is an audio track recorded by a voice talent, that can be male or female depending on client’s preference. 

Most voice-over projects don’t require major audio editions. But sometimes the audio track needs to be synchronized with scenes or other tracks, such as music. Because of this, and in order to ensure high-quality results, a skilled audio or video editor supervises the recording process.

Furthermore, the translation of the script for voice-over tracks must beware of sentence length, since ideally, the target text should be of the same extension as the source text. If not, the translated audio may be longer than the original material, and the talent would need to read it with increased speed.

Voice and acting

Other audiovisual materials, like movies, series, video games or advertising, need more detailed audio localization. In those cases, dubbing is a more appropriate solution, because its outcome enables immersion by recreating the original audio. An expert translator adapts the script taking into account actors’ lip movements and line duration. Moreover, voice talents are actors or are specialized in dubbing. 

Given that the audio should be adapted to the actor’s expressions and actions on screen, dubbing implies a very thorough process of edition and revision. A reviewer checks the final product line by line to ensure the text fits perfectly into movements or scenes. 

Quality-driven

It may seem at plain sight that voice-over and dubbing services only involve recording sessions. But it’s actually a process that also entails localization and several instances of revision. For example, once translated, reviewers check the script extensively before recording to avoid introducing errors in the voice track. Furthermore, audio editors revise the material and verify compliance with any technical requirements. And finally, the recording is checked for errors in pronunciation, syntax or audio edition.

With all these factors in the scene, one thing is for sure. The right media localization solution combined with a quality-driven workflow will secure optimal translated content for the audience out there.

02/02/2021

A Look at VR and a World of Possibilities Amid a Pandemic

Slowly but surely, virtual reality (VR) is starting to become a more noticeable presence in our lives. Especially in the workplace. When many people think of VR, they think of fun recreational applications, but they don’t expect VR to transform their careers. Companies are finding the current reality of VR and potential future applications can play an important role in the workplace. 

When it comes to integrating VR into the workplace, the possibilities are endless. However, there are a few key benefits that companies are currently experimenting with that are worth considering. 

Improving Corporate Training

One main benefit of using VR in the workplace, is that employee training and onboarding can benefit greatly from these applications. There are many ways VR can play a role in corporate training, from making basic training materials more engaging to allowing them to practice vital on the job skills in a safe environment. VR applications to e-learning can help increase information retention, can create low stakes practice opportunities, and can allow employees to fully visualize what certain work assignments and environments will look like. 

Collaborating in Interactive Virtual Rooms 

Remote teams can greatly benefit from the connection potential that VR can offer. With more and more employees working remotely than ever before, they may be struggling to communicate in their new digital environment. For example, some employers are embracing collaborative and interactive virtual rooms that utilize 3D visualization features enabled by VR to provide a better replica to in-person meeting experiences for remote employees. These rooms use spatial computing technology to help foster staff collaboration in a more realistic office environment and can allow them to perform more typical in-person teamwork activities, such as writing on a virtual whiteboard like they would in a real life conference room. 

These 3D conference rooms can give employees the option of adding photos, videos, sticky notes, and text to a virtual white board in a way that feels collaborative and engaging. In these virtual rooms, employees may be able to see a 3D representation of an upcoming product design and they even have the potential to add notes directly to the 3D model in real time. These are just a few examples of how VR can make certain aspects of remote working feel less remote.

Creating Virtual Events

With countless in-person events cancelled in 2020 and with so much uncertainty about the future of large gatherings, VR provides a unique opportunity to overcome social distancing barriers. Those who run professional conferences in particular are eager to resume operations and VR can allow them to convert an in-person conference into a fully interactive virtual event. 

Virtual avatars allow attendees to network digitally in a way that feels personal but also doesn’t require physical social interaction. Panelists can host sessions from simulated, 360° rooms where viewers watch and submit questions from the safety and comfort of their own homes. Conference hosts and guests can host in-depth technical tutorials, can present new products, and can initiate thought provoking conversations all with the help of VR.

Satisfying Social Needs

While working from home has its perks, there is no denying that it can get a bit lonely from time to time. VR provides a socially receptive environment for employees to interact with their colleagues by providing the possibility to feel like they’re in the same room together, even though they are in different locations. For most, the biggest struggle to adjusting to working remotely was missing the consistent social interaction a job can provide. Luckily, VR is ready to rise to the challenge of making working remotely feel more social.

28/01/2021

Does Translation Quality Mean Different Things to Different People?

Quality is subjective. The old adage is true, one man’s trash is another’s treasure. Chances are, no two people will agree on the quality of every single meal, movie, piece of clothing, or electronic device they encounter. The translation industry is no different. When it comes to creating quality translations, all clients have varying standards. These standards may even differ from what the translator considers a quality translation to look like. This begs the question, does translation quality mean different things to different people?

Standards Vary

There is an expected set of quality standards that top translators aim to meet, such as ensuring that the final text of a translation project reflects the meaning of the source text, delivers the intended effect, and meets all project parameters. Avoiding any errors and accommodating cultural differences are important as well. That being said, clients may have their own idea of what quality means in regards to translations. 

In a sense, quality is accomplished when the client is satisfied with the work. Clients who work in more sensitive fields, such as the medical industry where a mistranslation can lead to fatal misunderstandings, may expect the final text to be perfect. Some clients may feel that a below par translation can damage their brand. Other clients may simply require a translation that is decent enough to convey the overall meaning of the source text. For example, if the text won’t be customer facing or serves internal purposes. They just want to get the gist of it. Because of the time and resources required to perfect translated text, some clients may have lower standards than others. Before commencing a project, it can be helpful to define quality standards with the client. 

Machine Translation and Human Intervention

For most linguists the idea of quality means that the translation has no errors in meaning, is free of typos and conveys a message very accurately while keeping in mind the culture of the target language. Some translators feel it is inconceivable that clients may be content with a complete machine translation output. When asked to perform post-editing and improve the text quality, many translators find it very difficult to just correct serious mistakes and avoid a complete rewrite of the translation.

While machine translation is a very helpful tool that can save both time and money, human intervention can help avoid mistakes in a translation project and can make capturing the meaning of the source text in a natural and intuitive way easier. However, if perfection is not the goal, a client may find that MT and MT+ post-editing processes meet their needs. 

The Takeaway

Unfortunately, there are no official metrics or benchmarks that translators can follow to achieve quality, as a one-size-fits-all approach to translations can’t universally meet the needs, purposes, and budgets of every client a translator will encounter. The goal of service providers should be to ensure the client is satisfied and to be mindful of their expectations of quality. If the expectations of qualities are clear at the beginning of the project and ultimately met, then both parties should be satisfied with the service provided.

26/01/2021

Post-editing Highlights: What to Correct

The implementation of artificial intelligence provides new resources and possibilities to the localization industry. As a result, the translation workflows change. Because of that, language professionals perform additional tasks apart from translation or editing, such as pre-editing, post-editing or Machine Translation (MT) evaluation.

Post-editing implies reviewing a MT output in order to improve it and to obtain a semantically and syntactically accurate target text. This service is a specialized task that requires a specific set of skills, expertise and competencies.

Trained post-editors are aware of the most common mistakes MT makes and quickly implement the changes needed. Let’s analyze some of the most common errors addressed in the post-editing stage.

Mistranslations and omissions

Whether a document or project need deep or light post-editing, there are mistakes that post-editors always correct in the post-editing stage. They scan the output text for omitted or added words, phrases or segments. Additionally, they will correct mistranslations, semantic and syntactic errors applying quick and short changes. Correcting numerical and tag mismatches between source and target text is also a must during post-editing.

Furthermore, if specified for a project, reviewers evaluate if the output complies with stylistic guidelines and correct it accordingly.

With all these basic improvements, post-editing ensures that the target text is accurately translated and properly formatted.

Limits of AI

Mistranslations or omissions are common errors that can be found even in human translation. But other mistakes are related to the capabilities of the artificial intelligence engine. Some of them are the following:

  • Post-editors spot errors in the output that can be due to a spelling error in the source text. When the misspelled word or cipher exists, the engine translates it, but the target text will convey the wrong meaning. Because vendors master specific domains, they are able to spot those errors.
  • If there are acronym preferences specified, post-editors will ensure they are properly translated in target text. This is because the MT engine might accurately translate well-known acronyms (e.g., WHO>OMS), but non-familiar ones can be left untranslated. Also, there might be inconsistencies in how they are translated or explained in the target text.
  • Depending on the engine (if it’s, for instance, example based, ruled based or neural), some types tend to mirror the letter case of words. Post-editors correct any capitalization mistake generated by differences in the capitalization rules between target and source text. 
  • Some projects may have the specification of leaving untranslated certain terms or phrases, for example, codes of web pages, proper names or institution names. While reviewing the output, the post-editor ensures the target text complies with that requirement.
  • Sometimes, the MT engine misreads punctuation by interpreting it wrongly or mirroring the source text’s punctuation. Post-editors must be aware of the most common punctuation mistakes (for instance, mistranslation of the long dash and colon in English into Spanish text pairs) and correct them accordingly.
  • The MT output can be grammatically and syntactically correct, but still don’t comply with, for example, the character limit specified for a project. Post-editors will bear in mind the specific requirements and apply the appropriate changes.

Leave it to the experts

Relying on expert post-editors ensures that providers with a specific background and know-how handle the MT workflows. Experience and expertise allow vendors to implement the required improvements in MT outputs without sacrificing time nor productivity.

Native Translators vs Non-Native Translators
20/01/2021

Native Translators vs Non-Native Translators

While both native translators and non-native translators have valuable skill sets, native translators often have the upper hand on non-native translators thanks to their organic understanding of the target language and culture. A native translator translates source text into their mother tongue. They have extensive knowledge of a secondary language from which they translate into their first language. A non-native translator is one that translates from their mother language into a secondary language, which they have extensive knowledge of.

Keep reading to learn about the key differences between working with native translators and non-native translators. 

Writing Skills 

While reading the source copy, a native translator will be able to infer the meaning easily enough and will know when they need to do research to complete their understanding of the text. If you flip the table though and expect them to translate content from their native language to a secondary language, this is where they may fall behind a native translator of the target language. 

For example, if a German translator is translating Russian text (their secondary language) into German (their first language), they can understand the text easily enough because of their extensive knowledge of the second language and can do more research as necessary. If, in turn, they needed to translate text from German to Russian, their job would become a lot more difficult. They could fall behind a translator who is Russian and a native translator of the target language.

A native translator will be less likely to make grammar mistakes or overly complicate their grammar use in their native language. Proper sentence flow comes so much more naturally in your native tongue, which is what you’ll want the reader to experience. In addition, native translators can create more complex written content and will have more opportunities to use the best possible word choices. It’s important to note that some non-native linguists have years of experience gained from living many years in another country using the second language and can have a proficient use of the second language. 

Cultural Knowledge

Knowledge of culture plays an important role in both translation and transcreation. Especially when it comes to forms of content that rely heavily on cultural references such as entertainment subtitles or marketing campaigns. When conveying or adapting cultural elements in translation, once again, native translators have an advantage as they can cater to the target audience with their organic knowledge. References relating to politics, movies, current events, and common jokes are all useful cultural aspects available to native speakers. This is especially true when it comes to dialect choices.

Because a language can have various dialects often associated with physical locations, a native translator will usually be aware of relevant dialect choices that a fluent, but non-native translator won’t be privy to. A simple example of how dialect can vary is seen in the United States where the use of English is modified by region. For example, Midwestern residents refer to “soda” as “pop”, whereas someone on the West or East Coast would never call a soda a pop. A literal translation while technically correct may not be as accurately expressive as a non-literal translation by someone with regional expertise.

Creative Potential

For both translation and transcreation, creativity is often necessary to do the job most effectively. A native translator can often assist with translating humor and cultural references that would fall flat if translated literally. Marketing materials are a prime example of where creativity can shine. When trying to sell a product to a new culture, a native translator will be more aware of what could potentially offend that culture, what they will find funny, or what they will relate to. Not to mention language devices like rhyming, idioms, and alliteration will be much more attainable by a native translator, leaving the native translator with more creative opportunities. 
At Terra Translation, our translators are native speakers of the target language. We follow the standards, set by ISO 17100 in which we have certification. This standard, for translation services requirements, states that translation work should be completed by a professional translator translating source text into their native language.

15/12/2020

Are you complying with this OSHA requirement?

Our society is always evolving and the workplace is no exception. The Hispanic presence in the US workforce is growing, and as of 2018 this group made up 17.5% of the US labor force, with that number being anticipated to grow in the following years. Hispanic workers are present across all industries ranging from construction (34.3%), to finance (22.9%), to manufacturing (21.3%). Their contribution to the US workforce is undeniable. Which is why OSHA standards are so important for employers to follow. There is one requirement in particular that can help protect our Hispanic workforce and any other employees who are not native English speakers.

What is OSHA?

First things first. You may be wondering what exactly OSHA is. OSHA, aka the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, works to create important rules and regulations that businesses have to follow to remain in compliance with proper safety protocols. If they fail to follow them, dangerous accidents can occur as well as large fines and penalties.  

OSHA sets and enforces standards through training and education that touches a variety of industries such as healthcare, oil and gas, and even maritime. Employers are responsible for ensuring that all of their workers are aware of OSHA requirements and they must train them properly on the best safety practices.

A Key Requirement

One important OSHA requirement that employers must adhere to is making sure that their workers receive imperative information and training regarding safety measures, workplace hazards, how to prevent accidents, and any OSHA standards that apply to their workplace. An even more important requirement is that employers must provide that information and training to their employees in a language and vocabulary that the worker can understand clearly and absolutely. 

For workplaces that have any Hispanic employees, translating e-learning materials into Spanish may be absolutely necessary to stay in compliance with OSHA.

How to Meet OSHA Language Requirements

Given the pandemic and many workplaces operating remotely or keeping their employees separated while on the job, online training can be an extremely effective and safe way to deploy employee training. E-learning can help boost engagement, give employees flexibility to take training when and where is convenient for them, and it can be an enjoyable way to learn. 

Another benefit of online training is that they are easy to adapt to other languages for employers that have a diverse staff. The localization of e-learning materials takes not only language differences into account, but cultural differences as well.To help employers meet their training obligations, OSHA has a web-based assistance tool that can aid employers with a Spanish-speaking workforce in identifying the Spanish-language outreach resources on OSHA’s website. By providing training for employees in their native language, employers can make sure workers completely understand the instructions and rules that must be followed. This will create a safer work environment for everybody.

10/12/2020

The Major Benefits of VR in E-Learning

In some ways, virtual reality (VR) still feels very futuristic. Television and movies led us to believe that VR would be all encompassing, surrounding us in a complete fantasy world whenever we wanted. In reality, when it comes to VR, the future is here. It just doesn’t look like what we thought it would. VR applications touch many industries and one industry most people wouldn’t realize offhand is the e-learning industry. 

With it, VR brings the power of presence. Because our brains treat VR like a real experience, e-learning content that takes advantage of VR techniques has the potential to be extremely engaging, amongst a slew of other benefits. 

1. Engagement 

When it comes to fostering engagement during e-learning, VR is hard to beat. VR can captivate an audience, capturing students’ undivided attention and allowing them to learn in an immersive way. A 2016 study in China looked at VR’s effectiveness as a learning tool. The study found that the passing rate for students that engaged with the e-learning material via VR was 93%. The students that did not utilize VR techniques to study the exact same material only had a pass rate of 73%.

2. Experiential & Embodied Learning 

VR can offer students hands-on practice using their own bodies. Imagine during a training being able to interact with different objects in a scene and how much more tangible that experience would feel compared to reading about it or watching someone else doing it? This could be something as small as opening a door or a more in-depth equipment training. Research suggests that when we use our hands or move, we’re able to remember what we learned better.

3. State-Dependent Retention

Research shows that you can recall information better if you’re in the same environment you encoded that information in. VR provides a safe opportunity to learn in an environment similar to one where students may be tested one day, such as a fireman training to learn how to save someone from a burning building. 

4. Deliberate Practice

VR in e-learning thrives on mistakes. Why? When you utilize VR in e-learning, students can practice and get feedback immediately after making a mistake. Students will have the opportunity to fail and test out new solutions in a risk-free setting. This is especially ideal for job training that requires someone to react quickly in stressful situations. VR can help identify performance gaps when the stakes are much lower and can provide valuable online training experiences before entering real-life situations.

5. Visualization

Visualization helps students learn. Instead of staring at a page in a book or hearing a lecturer discuss their experiences, imagine being able to have those experiences yourself? While VR is not a replacement for true reality, it can provide visualized learning experiences. For example, during a VR e-learning opportunity, you may be able to move your head and as you do see what changes around you, just as you would in real life. Visualization can lead to a greater understanding of the material and can help with retention. 

6. Storytelling & Empathy With Characters

A famous Stanford study from 1969 found that students who were tasked with memorizing words retained six to seven times more words when incorporating them into a story compared to the students who simply tried to memorize a list. Storytelling has always had an impact on humans, especially when we can empathize with characters. VR can incorporate both storytelling and empathetic characters into e-learning. The potential to impersonate a character yourself while interacting with other characters in the story can enhance the feeling of being immersed in the story, can make the student more invested in the characters, and can increase retention rates.

7. Analysis Abilities

From a creator standpoint, VR can give the opportunity to have more data and insight into the learning experience. Techniques like head and eye tracking, head and body tracking, and heatmaps can give creators insight into how they can improve the learning experience for students. Creators can receive analytics that illustrate the time it takes students to complete tasks in the virtual world or can alert students of any mistakes they make. This high-level access to such valuable data means that VR techniques in e-learning will keep getting better and better.

08/12/2020

A Quality Cycle: About Back Translation and Reconciliation Services

Assuring quality in all its aspects —semantics, grammar, stylistic and cultural accuracy, optimal format, correct terminology— is one of the pillars of localization workflows. In this regard, quality is not ensured by applying one single action. On the contrary, many factors contribute to quality, such as linguist selection, efficient use of tools and different processes of quality control.

There are certain textual materials that are highly sensitive and have a major impact on the life of people related to them. This is the case, for instance, of pharmaceutical and clinical protocols, clinical research, financial or medical reports. When working with these documents, clients and/or Language Service Providers (LSPs) can opt for adding another quality assurance step, called back translation. This step can be useful in the following scenarios:

  • The content needs rigorous control, since any semantic error can have practical consequences.
  • Sometimes clients don’t speak nor read in the target language and want to check the accuracy of the translation by themselves.
  • When reviewing transcreated text, clients want to assess how the linguistic team translated a slogan or other marketing copy, and what meaning it conveys in the target language.

The three-column text

The aim of back translation is to have another instance of control of the target text’s quality; mostly in terms of terminology and semantic accuracy. It consists of performing another translation, but this time of the target text into the source text language.

For example, if we translated a clinical protocol from English into Spanish, we would apply another process of translation, but from the Spanish target into English again. The resulting new English text will never be an outbound translation. The new English translation is not intended for publishing nor distribution. The outcome of a back translation process is only for internal use in the localization process. The linguistic team performs it only for quality assurance purposes.

Moreover, we can point out the following characteristics for back translation outcomes:

  • They are literal.
  • They will never result in a version exactly the same as the original source; it helps to identify discrepancies or errors in the translation.
  • A different linguist not involved in the original translation workflow works on it. Sometimes, they don’t even have access to the first source text (blind translation). 

Let’s reconcile

After the above-mentioned step, the same linguist or a different one will read and compare the source text against this new outcome. If no critical difference in meaning or mistranslations are flagged, the translation is considered accurate, and the process finishes. On the other hand, if the reviewer spots discrepancies, he or she will mark them up for further review, in which the team fixes the translation. Sometimes, they fill reports with the errors found and corrected in this step.

Evaluate

The process of back translation is very thorough and implies an exhausting revision of the translation that goes beyond editing or proofreading. However, it demands a well-planned and wide deadline, and the use of several professionals. Because of this, LSPs and/or clients should consider if back translation is appropriate for a certain project considering time, resources, and budget. If not, there may be other ways of ensuring quality too, through one of the multiple means the localization industry has come to develop.

02/12/2020

In Team We Trust: Virtual Leadership

Unexpected times come along with unexpected outcomes. Recently, many companies around the globe had to face this fact. In order to continue their operations (providing essential services), they found themselves in need of moving the workplace from the office to home. Organizations that are new to this setting are discovering and dealing with the specificities of working remotely. For example, communicating face to face differs from a briefing by email. Or scheduling activities for on-premises staff implies different strategies than planning tasks for a disperse remote team. Thus, leadership is not the same either: managers who are accustomed to working in the office need to refine their skills for the purpose of leading and having a positive influence over a virtual staff.

Terra Translations has put together virtual teams and achieved goals every day for 20 years, with the invaluable support of its operations managers and language leads. Based on that asset built over two decades, here we provide some insight into organizational and communication strategies to support the switch into a model of remote leadership.

Enhancing vs. controlling

Monitoring and over-controlling sometimes are common reactions when shifting to a remote workplace. Leaders can’t see what the team is doing, and that could be upsetting for them. But soon that kind of supervision will be proven limited and unnecessary. When operating remotely, controlling a team at all times isn’t possible nor desirable, because engaging in those attitudes is very exhausting for every member of a team, and also an obstacle for building strong interpersonal relationships. 

Successful leaders will enhance the potential of the members of their team and motivate them to achieve the outcomes desired. This is done by establishing daily workflows based more on projects than on daily fixed schedules. Project-based workflows imply working target-oriented, so every member of a team can provide their skills and competencies with this shared goal in mind. In contrast to monitoring compliance with a fixed schedule (like from 9 to 5), leaders will assess projects’ progress, productivity and wellbeing of the employees regularly. It’s trust, motivation and a shared sense of purpose that’s behind the cohesion of a team, not control nor fear.

One and others

The essence of leadership implies building a relationship with others, even when the task is carried out in a remote environment. Communication is the ground and the means to do so. In that regard, experts suggest that, first of all, leaders need to learn how to communicate through the media that works best for each team or member. Maybe some colleagues are more receptive to oral communication, while others receive better input by emails or briefs. 

Moreover, efficient virtual leaders build a healthy self-image that helps them in their role. With that in mind, despite being aware that they are not perfect and are not able to do it all, leaders build a confident self-sense around their capabilities and competencies. In that regard, in the process of developing a leading personality, continuous learning is crucial. Leaders should always be receptive to feedback and need to ask open questions to the colleagues they trust the most to learn from their insights and opinions. 

Lastly, a virtual leader embraces and masters the available technology, because it’s an ally, not a barrier. Successful managers explore the possibilities that software offers to daily operations: file-sharing, dynamic scheduling, pervasive communication and automation.

26/11/2020

How to Optimize E-Learning Courses For Millenials

Because millennials are the first generation to grow up with technology at their fingertips, e-learning is a productive and positive way to conduct employee training. Providing staff with the proper resources for on the job training is a win-win for the business. They’ll walk away with an empowered and skilled workforce. At the same time, their employees will feel confident that their company respects their contributions and is supporting their career development. Let’s take a closer look at why e-learning for millennials is such a good fit.

An Evolving Workforce

By 2025, millennials are expected to make up 75% of the global workforce, so savvy employers should start prioritizing how millennials like to learn and work. Not only is the American workforce relying more and more on millennial workers, the workforce is also beginning to shift across other demographics. In recent years, hispanic workers made up 17.5% of the US labor force. Because so many hispanic millennials are a vital part of the US workforce, it’s important that employers provide resources that suit this demographic’s unique needs. 

Creating Effective Trainings

In order for employee training to be effective, e-learning creators should include elements tailored to their target audience. Who their target audience is will vary based on who they’ve hired, but it’s safe to assume most companies have millennials on their staff at this point. E-learning courses in particular often appeal to millennials as training conducted through online courses or mobile apps are often personalizable, flexible, and highly engaging, which are all traits that millennials crave. Their comfort with technology minimizes complications during e-learning training and allows them to learn where and when is best for them and at their own pace. 

To create effective training for millennials, employers should aim to utilize the most engaging e-learning techniques, such as gamification. They should also embrace social aspects of training by encouraging staff to engage with each other while learning through communication platforms and leaderboards. Evaluating progress throughout e-learning training can also be effective and motivating for students, as they can easily go back and review any information they didn’t understand before their evaluation.

Why Course Localization Matters

When it comes to making e-learning courses that are tailored to their employees’ needs, businesses may want to consider localizing their e-courses. The localization of e-learning courses goes far past simply translating materials. Localization takes intent, context, and culture into account, creating a much clearer and more effective learning experience. 

Localization can touch a variety of areas of an e-learning course, from written content, to graphics, to audio, to units of measurement. Localizing e-courses specifically for their Spanish variant is particularly important. Doing so can help native Spanish speakers understand their training fully and make employees feel more connected and valued by their company. Investing in localization is both cost and time effective, because it can lead to higher employee engagement and lower attrition rates.