Creado el: 20/01/2021
Creado por: Jacqueline De Marco

Native Translators vs Non-Native Translators

While both native translators and non-native translators have valuable skill sets, native translators often have the upper hand on non-native translators thanks to their organic understanding of the target language and culture. A native translator translates source text into their mother tongue. They have extensive knowledge of a secondary language from which they translate into their first language. A non-native translator is one that translates from their mother language into a secondary language, which they have extensive knowledge of.

Keep reading to learn about the key differences between working with native translators and non-native translators. 

Writing Skills 

While reading the source copy, a native translator will be able to infer the meaning easily enough and will know when they need to do research to complete their understanding of the text. If you flip the table though and expect them to translate content from their native language to a secondary language, this is where they may fall behind a native translator of the target language. 

For example, if a German translator is translating Russian text (their secondary language) into German (their first language), they can understand the text easily enough because of their extensive knowledge of the second language and can do more research as necessary. If, in turn, they needed to translate text from German to Russian, their job would become a lot more difficult. They could fall behind a translator who is Russian and a native translator of the target language.

A native translator will be less likely to make grammar mistakes or overly complicate their grammar use in their native language. Proper sentence flow comes so much more naturally in your native tongue, which is what you’ll want the reader to experience. In addition, native translators can create more complex written content and will have more opportunities to use the best possible word choices. It’s important to note that some non-native linguists have years of experience gained from living many years in another country using the second language and can have a proficient use of the second language. 

Cultural Knowledge

Knowledge of culture plays an important role in both translation and transcreation. Especially when it comes to forms of content that rely heavily on cultural references such as entertainment subtitles or marketing campaigns. When conveying or adapting cultural elements in translation, once again native translators have an advantage as they can cater to the target audience with their organic knowledge. References relating to politics, movies, current events, and common jokes are all useful cultural aspects available to native speakers. This is especially true when it comes to dialect choices.

Because a language can have various dialects often associated with physical locations, a native translator will usually be aware of relevant dialect choices that a fluent, but non-native translator won’t be privy to. A simple example of how dialect can vary is seen in the United States where the use of English is modified by region. For example, Midwestern residents refer to “soda” as “pop”, whereas someone on the West or East Coast would never call a soda a pop. A literal translation while technically correct may not be as accurately expressive as a non-literal translation by someone with regional expertise.

Creative Potential

For both translation and transcreation, creativity is often necessary to do the job most effectively. A native translator can often assist with translating humor and cultural references that would fall flat if translated literally. Marketing materials are a prime example of where creativity can shine. When trying to sell a product to a new culture, a native translator will be more aware of what could potentially offend that culture, what they will find funny, or what they will relate to. Not to mention language devices like rhyming, idioms, and alliteration will be much more attainable by a native translator, leaving the native translator with more creative opportunities. 
At Terra Translation, our translators are native speakers of the target language. We follow the standards, set by ISO 17100 in which we have certification. This standard, for translation services requirements, states that translation work should be completed by a professional translator translating source text into their native language.


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Creado el: 15/01/2021
Creado por: Jacqueline De Marco

6 Major Benefits of Video-Based Learning

Sometimes it feels like the world has gone video crazy. Video calls, video centric social media posts, and an endless amount of streaming platforms have made it easier than ever to consume great content and connect with our loved ones. Video content is even making its way into the education space, which has been a game changer in light of coronavirus related restrictions for workplaces and schools. Video-based learning has some major benefits worth considering, especially for workplace training.

Accessible & Proven

Here’s a fun fact about video-based learning for you. On YouTube, there are more videos that relate to learning than there are books in the entire Library of Congress. The numbers show that people turn to educational videos on YouTube to satisfy their curiosity on certain topics, so the video format definitely works for many viewers. One of the main benefits of video content is it is available on demand. Typically, e-learning videos are on the shorter side which helps keep the audience engaged and takes advantage of the benefits of microlearning. With the addition of headphones, it’s easy to consume this content on the go. 

Entertaining & Engaging

We all know why we like video content when it comes to entertainment, but when it comes to video-based learning, it’s important to look at why it works so well. Luckily, there are some cold hard facts relating to why video content can help boost the e-learning process. It turns out that viewers retain 95% of a message seen in a video compared to just 10% of the message when reading text. While everyone learns differently, video-based learning is clearly a tool that works well for many people. Video content is enjoyable to watch and can serve as a nice break from reading heavy text. Not to mention, it can allow the viewer to learn in both a visual and audible way at the same time.

Cost Effective

Training employees is expensive, but creating video training for employees is a very cost effective way to do training for topics that many employees will have to learn more about. Depending on the production needs, employers can generally create video content fairly inexpensively. Because they can reuse the video training repeatedly, this type of content can be an investment that pays off greatly down the line. 

Video-based learning is a great solution for HR required trainings about sexual harassment and workplace safety, for teaching a new employee more about the company on their first day, and for showing step by step processes of how to use company-wide tools and systems. 

Localization Potential

Another benefit of video-based learning, that is also super cost effective, is the fact that video content has some amazing localization potential. Many e-learning videos can be localized to multiple languages. With the creation of just one video, businesses can later add subtitles, dubbing or voice overs in different languages. This helps them avoid the cost of producing videos in multiple languages and can boost employee engagement and retainment. By offering educational content in their first language, employers are showing their employees they care about having a diverse workforce and are invested in their career development and day-to-day work lives.


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Creado el: 22/12/2020
Creado por: Jacqueline De Marco

2020: A Year of Challenges, Achievements, and Gratitude

By Marina Ilari

While I am so grateful for our kind, supportive, and hard working team every day of the year, as 2020 ends I can’t help but reflect on how special they made an undeniably difficult year. Without them, Terra could not have achieved everything we did this year, from supporting charities we’re passionate about to delivering unparalleled results for our amazing clients. 

Our Team’s Achievements

My gratitude for our team extends well past what they achieve, but I am also so proud of all the achievements born out of their hard work and commitment to excellence. While our team accomplished great things every day, these are a few of our standout moments. 

We were also awarded the Focus on the future Award, which meant so much to our entire team. Terra received this award for maintaining an employee-centric focus by managing the health and well-being of our workforce. This award was so meaningful to us because it confirmed we were doing our best to create a healthy and happy working environment, especially when the pandemic hit.

Growth Amongst Challenges

In December 2019 our team was made up of 55 members. I am so thrilled to report that during 2020, 34 members joined our team, which amounted to a 62% growth rate. Most of our new additions took on Project Management roles, but some are linguists who work in quality assurance and editor roles.

Like all businesses, we faced a unique set of challenges due to the onset of COVID-19. We are so proud of how our team weathered so many sudden changes. At the beginning of the pandemic, many people were struggling with lockdown and working remotely for the first time. Having always worked remotely, we wanted to send positive vibes and help in any way we could. We created a video with positive messages to show support from our team members. 

Even though we’re accustomed to working remotely, we know firsthand how many challenges there were to overcome. Our team members were not used to having “more people at home”. Between children not going to school and partners suddenly working from home as well, things could get loud and crowded during the work day. We are extremely thankful and proud of everyone for rising to these challenges and supporting their teammates when they needed it most.

How We Gave Back 

At Terra, giving back to our community is a core value that we all share. Philanthropy is something that is widely supported by our team. In 2016, we launched an initiative called Terra Cares which provides pro-bono translation services to select healthcare and legal focused non-profit organizations within our communities. In 2018, we expanded our efforts by partnering with Doctors Without Borders, a global non-profit that provides medical services to areas in crisis around the world. Our Terra Cares program aims to eliminate economic barriers and leverage social connections to improve people’s lives. 

We participate in a variety of philanthropic opportunities that support our local communities and our industry as a whole. 

In 2020 we presented at multiple online conferences on a wide spectrum of topics, including:

Our video game localization division, Terra Localizations,  also participated in industry events and virtual opportunities like:

We created useful resources that we hope provide insight into the challenges that working remotely can cause, such as:

Our Annual Team Building Event

For the past few years, we’ve come together at the end of the year in Buenos Aires for team building activities and a special dinner. This is really important to us because it’s the one time a year we all get to spend time together face to face. 

In 2019 while we were in Buenos Aires for the annual event, a small group of Terra Translations teammates worked on the shooting of a dozen videos for social media which included the stellar performance of a dog, who we named “Fuzzy” (a tongue in cheek reference to fuzzy matches in CAT tools).

We had a fantastic time shooting them and have really enjoyed sharing them with the rest of our team (and the world) so that everyone could see what we were up to. The videos have premiered monthly in 2020 and these are a few of our favorites!

Of course, this year doing this annual event was not possible, but we didn’t let distance stop us from bonding as a team. Thankfully, the wonders of technology meant that we could still get together for a fun-filled couple of hours to celebrate what has been an undoubtedly challenging year for us all. We had a safe and socially distant Zoom party and spent a couple of hours playing games and having some fun together.

As a virtual team, meeting in person once a year has been amazing for our team-building and culture. So this year we put a lot of thought into what we could do virtually that would actually be super fun and not just feel like another Zoom meeting.

What’s to Come? 
As a team, I know we’re all looking forward to starting a new year and a new chapter. Our video game localization division in particular will be taking advantage of the new year’s fresh start. During 2020, this division underwent aesthetics changes, which included a new logo, and illustrations designed by the extremely talented Hector Adrián Rodera.

We are excited to embrace some new changes next year and can’t wait for you to see what we have up our sleeves. Hint — we all deserve a little refresh from time to time.

In 2021 and beyond, we hope to continue to grow our team, our services, and our philanthropic work. Each year we become stronger together. Cheers!



Creado el: 15/12/2020
Creado por: Jacqueline De Marco

Are you complying with this OSHA requirement?

Our society is always evolving and the workplace is no exception. The Hispanic presence in the US workforce is growing, and as of 2018 this group made up 17.5% of the US labor force, with that number being anticipated to grow in the following years. Hispanic workers are present across all industries ranging from construction (34.3%), to finance (22.9%), to manufacturing (21.3%). Their contribution to the US workforce is undeniable. Which is why OSHA standards are so important for employers to follow. There is one requirement in particular that can help protect our Hispanic workforce and any other employees who are not native English speakers.

What is OSHA?

First things first. You may be wondering what exactly OSHA is. OSHA, aka the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, works to create important rules and regulations that businesses have to follow to remain in compliance with proper safety protocols. If they fail to follow them, dangerous accidents can occur as well as large fines and penalties.  

OSHA sets and enforces standards through training and education that touches a variety of industries such as healthcare, oil and gas, and even maritime. Employers are responsible for ensuring that all of their workers are aware of OSHA requirements and they must train them properly on the best safety practices.

A Key Requirement

One important OSHA requirement that employers must adhere to is making sure that their workers receive imperative information and training regarding safety measures, workplace hazards, how to prevent accidents, and any OSHA standards that apply to their workplace. An even more important requirement is that employers must provide that information and training to their employees in a language and vocabulary that the worker can understand clearly and absolutely. 

For workplaces that have any Hispanic employees, translating e-learning materials into Spanish may be absolutely necessary to stay in compliance with OSHA.

How to Meet OSHA Language Requirements

Given the pandemic and many workplaces operating remotely or keeping their employees separated while on the job, online training can be an extremely effective and safe way to deploy employee training. E-learning can help boost engagement, give employees flexibility to take training when and where is convenient for them, and it can be an enjoyable way to learn. 

Another benefit of online training is that they are easy to adapt to other languages for employers that have a diverse staff. The localization of e-learning materials takes not only language differences into account, but cultural differences as well.To help employers meet their training obligations, OSHA has a web-based assistance tool that can aid employers with a Spanish-speaking workforce in identifying the Spanish-language outreach resources on OSHA’s website. By providing training for employees in their native language, employers can make sure workers completely understand the instructions and rules that must be followed. This will create a safer work environment for everybody.


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Creado el: 10/12/2020
Creado por: Jacqueline De Marco

The Major Benefits of VR in E-Learning

In some ways, virtual reality (VR) still feels very futuristic. Television and movies led us to believe that VR would be all encompassing, surrounding us in a complete fantasy world whenever we wanted. In reality, when it comes to VR, the future is here. It just doesn’t look like what we thought it would. VR applications touch many industries and one industry most people wouldn’t realize offhand is the e-learning industry. 

With it, VR brings the power of presence. Because our brains treat VR like a real experience, e-learning content that takes advantage of VR techniques has the potential to be extremely engaging, amongst a slew of other benefits. 

1. Engagement 

When it comes to fostering engagement during e-learning, VR is hard to beat. VR can captivate an audience, capturing students’ undivided attention and allowing them to learn in an immersive way. A 2016 study in China looked at VR’s effectiveness as a learning tool. The study found that the passing rate for students that engaged with the e-learning material via VR was 93%. The students that did not utilize VR techniques to study the exact same material only had a pass rate of 73%.

2. Experiential & Embodied Learning 

VR can offer students hands-on practice using their own bodies. Imagine during a training being able to interact with different objects in a scene and how much more tangible that experience would feel compared to reading about it or watching someone else doing it? This could be something as small as opening a door or a more in-depth equipment training. Research suggests that when we use our hands or move, we’re able to remember what we learned better.

3. State-Dependent Retention

Research shows that you can recall information better if you’re in the same environment you encoded that information in. VR provides a safe opportunity to learn in an environment similar to one where students may be tested one day, such as a fireman training to learn how to save someone from a burning building. 

4. Deliberate Practice

VR in e-learning thrives on mistakes. Why? When you utilize VR in e-learning, students can practice and get feedback immediately after making a mistake. Students will have the opportunity to fail and test out new solutions in a risk-free setting. This is especially ideal for job training that requires someone to react quickly in stressful situations. VR can help identify performance gaps when the stakes are much lower and can provide valuable online training experiences before entering real-life situations.

5. Visualization

Visualization helps students learn. Instead of staring at a page in a book or hearing a lecturer discuss their experiences, imagine being able to have those experiences yourself? While VR is not a replacement for true reality, it can provide visualized learning experiences. For example, during a VR e-learning opportunity, you may be able to move your head and as you do see what changes around you, just as you would in real life. Visualization can lead to a greater understanding of the material and can help with retention. 

6. Storytelling & Empathy With Characters

A famous Stanford study from 1969 found that students who were tasked with memorizing words retained six to seven times more words when incorporating them into a story compared to the students who simply tried to memorize a list. Storytelling has always had an impact on humans, especially when we can empathize with characters. VR can incorporate both storytelling and empathetic characters into e-learning. The potential to impersonate a character yourself while interacting with other characters in the story can enhance the feeling of being immersed in the story, can make the student more invested in the characters, and can increase retention rates.

7. Analysis Abilities

From a creator standpoint, VR can give the opportunity to have more data and insight into the learning experience. Techniques like head and eye tracking, head and body tracking, and heatmaps can give creators insight into how they can improve the learning experience for students. Creators can receive analytics that illustrate the time it takes students to complete tasks in the virtual world or can alert students of any mistakes they make. This high-level access to such valuable data means that VR techniques in e-learning will keep getting better and better.


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Creado el: 26/11/2020
Creado por: Jacqueline De Marco

How to Optimize E-Learning Courses For Millenials

Because millennials are the first generation to grow up with technology at their fingertips, e-learning is a productive and positive way to conduct employee training. Providing staff with the proper resources for on the job training is a win-win for the business. They’ll walk away with an empowered and skilled workforce. At the same time, their employees will feel confident that their company respects their contributions and is supporting their career development. Let’s take a closer look at why e-learning for millennials is such a good fit.

An Evolving Workforce

By 2025, millennials are expected to make up 75% of the global workforce, so savvy employers should start prioritizing how millennials like to learn and work. Not only is the American workforce relying more and more on millennial workers, the workforce is also beginning to shift across other demographics. In recent years, hispanic workers made up 17.5% of the US labor force. Because so many hispanic millennials are a vital part of the US workforce, it’s important that employers provide resources that suit this demographic’s unique needs. 

Creating Effective Trainings

In order for employee training to be effective, e-learning creators should include elements tailored to their target audience. Who their target audience is will vary based on who they’ve hired, but it’s safe to assume most companies have millennials on their staff at this point. E-learning courses in particular often appeal to millennials as training conducted through online courses or mobile apps are often personalizable, flexible, and highly engaging, which are all traits that millennials crave. Their comfort with technology minimizes complications during e-learning training and allows them to learn where and when is best for them and at their own pace. 

To create effective training for millennials, employers should aim to utilize the most engaging e-learning techniques, such as gamification. They should also embrace social aspects of training by encouraging staff to engage with each other while learning through communication platforms and leaderboards. Evaluating progress throughout e-learning training can also be effective and motivating for students, as they can easily go back and review any information they didn’t understand before their evaluation.

Why Course Localization Matters

When it comes to making e-learning courses that are tailored to their employees’ needs, businesses may want to consider localizing their e-courses. The localization of e-learning courses goes far past simply translating materials. Localization takes intent, context, and culture into account, creating a much clearer and more effective learning experience. 

Localization can touch a variety of areas of an e-learning course, from written content, to graphics, to audio, to units of measurement. Localizing e-courses specifically for their Spanish variant is particularly important. Doing so can help native Spanish speakers understand their training fully and make employees feel more connected and valued by their company. Investing in localization is both cost and time effective, because it can lead to higher employee engagement and lower attrition rates


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Creado el: 18/11/2020
Creado por: Jacqueline De Marco

Translation of Summary of Benefits and Coverage 101

All professionals in the medical industry should have their consumers’ best needs at heart, this includes insurance companies. Generally they do, which is why so much importance is placed on the translation of Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC) in the medical industry. 

The role of a SBC is to ensure that consumers are aware of the health benefits and coverage available to them through their healthcare plan. In fact, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) typically requires that any group health plans or health insurance company provide a summary of benefits and coverage that can accurately describe the benefits and coverage available under the plan. While that definition will give you a quick glimpse at why SBCs are so important, let’s dive a bit deeper into this complicated topic and how medical translation comes into play.

What is an SBC?

Alongside helping consumers understand their health plan’s features and offerings, an SBC also covers the costs associated with the plan. An SBC can cover very complicated topics, such as cost sharing rules or limits and exceptions to coverage, in a way that is easy for the average consumer to understand. One way that a health insurance or plan company can do this is by providing consumers with a “Uniform Glossary” designed to clearly explain any medical or insurance-related terms that may apply to a plan. Not only are all plans required by the ACA to provide a SBC to their consumers, but they must follow a a uniform template that is customized to reflect the terms of a specific plan. 

Why do SBCs matter? 

It is of the utmost importance that consumers have access to an SBC. Not only does this access help them understand their plan features and the costs associated with it once they’re enrolled, but they can use the SBC to answer some of their general questions regarding a health plan before they choose to enroll in it. This knowledge helps consumers make informed decisions about their health and finances. 

Why does an SBC need to be translated into other languages?

Because we live in an increasingly global world, diversity must be kept in mind by health plans and insurance providers. A minimum of 350 languages are spoken in homes throughout the United States. While providing SBCs in each of those languages wouldn’t be possible, or even necessary as many of these languages are spoken by bilingual citizens, there are compliance regulations that dictate which languages providers must accommodate. Vital plan information must be available in the 15 non-English languages most commonly spoken in a state or languages spoken by at least 10 percent of a county’s population. The ACA, and other related statutes and regulations, currently have strict language requirements. For example, qualified health plans insurers that have been registered for at least one year are required to provide oral and written translation services to consumers in a minimum of 150 languages.

It is important to remember that the translation of Summary of Benefits and Coverage is not just a matter of compliance, but of inclusion. Providing resources for a growing and diverse population should always be a priority.



Creado el: 10/11/2020
Creado por: Jacqueline De Marco

The Biggest Translation Mistake You Can Make

Communication is key. This is a somewhat trite statement, but is almost always a true one. While there are many translation mistakes that can be made, some of the biggest mistakes relate to improper communication with clients. Luckily, these mistakes are also some of the easiest to avoid. To ensure quality during the translation process, and in the final product, achieving accuracy and properly capturing the intended effect of the text are of the utmost importance. Consider taking these steps to avoid the biggest translation mistake you can make: miscommunication.

Don’t Rely on Translation Memory

Translation memories (TMs) store text that was previously translated in a database format. The text can include specific words or longer fragments of text such as sentences and paragraphs. Clients occasionally provide their TMs to the translator which can be helpful. However, it’s worth noting that a translator should not prioritize a TM as a resource over a glossary or style guide. This is because TMs can contain mistakes, whereas glossaries list already approved terminology that the client themselves has vetted. A glossary can help clear up any confusion a translator encounters regarding word choice. However, if a translator doesn’t agree with a translation or believes it to be incorrect, speaking with the client about the issue and coming to an agreement about how best to move forward is a wise course of action. 

Discuss the Details

A strong attention to detail is a valuable skill to have in any field of work, but especially so in the translation industry. In translation projects, there may be areas of text that are ambiguous or even incorrect. If a translator is unsure about certain aspects of text they are translating or if they are using the ideal word choice, it can be worthwhile to discuss those details with the client. Trickier aspects of translation such as acronyms or areas of text that require transcreation are worth making note of so that everybody is on the same page. 

Request Client Feedback

Asking for client feedback is a strong communication tool that can help the translator learn more about the client’s expectations. It also allows for an opportunity to learn from mistakes made. This feedback is particularly important after taking a translation test. Even if you’ve passed a translation test, you can learn from asking about what you did right. Ask the client questions about what areas of the test they liked or if there are any terms or phrases they would like to be different moving forward. Keep an open mind and learn from their feedback to make your next project even more successful.

Ask The Right Questions

One of the best steps a translator can take to avoid the mistake of miscommunication, is to ask questions. Before, during, and upon finishing a project, it is of the utmost importance to ask the right questions. One area of the work worth clarifying is knowing what a client needs in order to provide an accurate translation. In some cases this may include providing certain context, references, visuals, or guidelines. In other cases, you may need to know if you should prioritize TMs over a glossary, or if you should reference previous published translations.

Never take anything for granted. Throughout the translation process, asking questions can help avoid mistakes and ensure quality. Communicating openly with the client to avoid making unnecessary mistakes will result in a better experience for both parties.


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Creado el: 04/11/2020
Creado por: Jacqueline De Marco

How to Tap Into the Potential of E-Learning Authoring Tools

It’s no secret that e-learning is all the rage these days. Many educators and employers have had no choice but to adapt their in-person lessons and training into a digital format in 2020. Unfortunately there was little warning that we needed to head in a more digital direction this year, so many e-learning courses are quickly being pulled together with PowerPoint presentations and homemade videos, and by using outdated tools like Flash. Investing in e-learning authoring tools is a great way to create quality content that is engaging and fun. These tools are easy to use and can make the entire process of e-learning better from start to finish. 

Essential Features of E-Learning Authoring Tools

Moving away from traditional education approaches and tapping into the potential of the available e-learning authoring tools can open the door to some really helpful features. While features vary based on which e-learning authoring tool you choose to utilize, these are some of the major benefits worth considering that most tools offer. 

  • Quizzes and surveys are a great way to boost engagement and to review how well the user is retaining the information presented to them. You can also use surveys to collect feedback from your users.
  • Video lectures and screencasts allow you to share video tutorials which can be more engaging for users. It can also be easier to present software tutorials over video instead of written text.
  • Interactive elements are another perk of working with e-learning authoring tools. 
  • Branching scenarios are possible with the use of e-learning authoring tools and allow the learner to make choices that affect how the course proceeds. Instead of following a linear experience, branching scenarios enable individual learning experiences and gives the creator a better understanding of the user’s knowledge. For example, if the user makes a mistake during texting, branching scenarios can then direct them to review the section they misunderstood.
  • Mobile learning support allows users to access their e-learning courses from their phones in a way that is convenient and easy to use. This functionality is practical and gives users to access their e-learning courses from virtually anywhere, at any time.

If you’re looking to take your educational content to the next level, there are some pretty handy e-learning authoring tools on the market such as: Articulate Storyline, Adobe Captivate, and Lectora Inspire.

Simplifying the Localization Process

Another major benefit of utilizing e-learning authoring tools is how much easier they make integrating the localization process. You can use these tools to easily export course content for localization. Properly localizing an e-learning course will create a more engaging and effective learning experience for the user. 

Localization doesn’t just translate content word for word. Culture, context, and intent are all taken into account as well. This can extend past just written text and affects photos, music, jokes, cultural references, word play, and more. 

Because e-learning courses for employee training can include complex technical jargon, acronyms, abbreviations, and regional slang, it’s important that your user has access to that vital information in a clear and digestible way. 


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Creado el: 29/10/2020
Creado por: Jacqueline De Marco

Boosting Employee Retention and Engagement by Translating HR Materials into Spanish

As the US workforce evolves, employers need to evolve with it. Hispanics are the fastest-growing US-born segment of the US population and as of 2018, hispanic workers accounted for 17.5% of the US labor force. Because of this growth, and the fact that researchers have discovered that businesses that prioritize diversity can benefit financially, it is important to adapt on the job resources for Spanish speakers. 

Millennial Values are Key to Employee Retention & Engagement

While having a high employee retention rate and a staff that is engaged in their work is always important, it is especially important now that millennials are the bulk of the workforce. Like all generations, millennials have their own unique set of values (although it is expected Gen Z will follow in their footsteps). To help employees feel a strong sense of personal engagement, and lower turnover risk, it’s important to understand what millennial employees value.

For millennials, it is important to feel valued and as if they have opportunities to connect with their managers or superiors in a way that feels personal to their career and benefits their progress in the workplace. They’re looking for more than just an annual review in terms of feedback and guidance. Millennials are also team players and they want to advance the welfare of their entire team, as well as their own welfare at work.

This millennial generation wants to feel like they belong and are a part of a group that shares their interests, values, and goals. Employers can take advantage of these desires by finding ways to cultivate a sense of community for their employees. One way to foster a sense of respect for employee values and create a feeling of belonging is by speaking their language and providing proper safety and HR materials for employees.

Why the Translation of Company Communications is Beneficial

As the hispanic workforce grows, it is becoming increasingly important to provide HR materials, as well as any safety training or manuals, in Spanish. As most of these materials only require a one-time translation (they can be used any time new hires join the organization), this is not a huge endeavor and is worth the benefits of employee satisfaction. Previous translations can be used as a base if updates are needed down the road, which makes the continued translation of these materials very sustainable. 

There are many other benefits associated with translating these materials. The proper distribution and understanding of both HR and safety materials are imperative for avoiding dangerous accidents or costly lawsuits. On an equally important note, they can help create a culturally inclusive work environment. Businesses need to ensure that their Spanish-speaking personnel understand their company’s policies, procedures, forms, and internal communications clearly in order to have productive, happy, and safe employees.

Other Solutions For Boosting Employee Engagement & Loyalty

Alongside the translation of HR materials and safety materials into Spanish, there are other steps employers can take to make all of their employees, including any hispanic employees, feel respected and valued.

  • Developing benefit designs that account for the extended family make-up of many Hispanic millennials
  • Implementing effective diversity training programs
  • Creating diversity councils
  • Establishing top-down diversity targets for recruitment and retention

The translation of important work materials into Spanish is imperative for building a diverse and engaged team of employees. Providing accessible training and support to Hispanic employees is an investment that is bound to make returns when it comes to employee performance, contentment, and retention.


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